Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'sump'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Blogs

  • Alexander72's Blog
  • SteveD's Blog
  • Norman's Blog
  • Marto's Blog
  • Soot1e's Blog
  • Dommo's Blog
  • KugaWestie's Blog
  • R7 WSC's Blog
  • shindha's Blog
  • Nothing ventured nothing gained
  • Mark's First Time Build Blog
  • marcusb's Blog
  • Meakin's Blog
  • pickmaster's Blog engine swap
  • Steve_Farrimond's Blog
  • PaulJones148's Blog
  • paul gibney's Blog
  • philwilson133's Blog
  • Koso Digital Dash Fitting
  • IanG1's Blog
  • Tel's Tales
  • chrisando's Blog
  • Pistol Pete - Essex AO x 0.5's Blog
  • Enclosed Trailer Build Diary
  • Piece of cake
  • johnbmaximus' Blog
  • harry may 11's Blog
  • johngill's Blog
  • waynezilla's Blog
  • Fishcake's Blog
  • Julian's 7se rebuild
  • japltor60's Blog
  • Xflow17's Blog
  • How to Assemble a Duratec
  • Beez's 2014 Sprint Blog
  • czphillips' Sigma Swap
  • West300's Blog
  • Speed Series Results
  • Wagoneer's Blog
  • First Westi
  • Quinten's Mighty Blog
  • Chriscooper1's Blog
  • Murraymint's Blog
  • johnev's Blog
  • Master Thatcher's Blog
  • Chris Hooper's SDV Mazda build.
  • Mr T's Blog
  • Nosbod's Mega S2000 Blog
  • stephenh's Blog
  • TREVORGIDLOW's Blog
  • AdamR's MX-R1000 Build
  • My Lawnmower Runs on Super...
  • johnev's Blog
  • John's Sport 250 Build
  • Jaguar C Type
  • Andy665's SEiGHT
  • Loton Park 2017
  • Toys4x4boys Westy Journey
  • Sprinting (not the Usain Bolt type)

Forums

  • Main Club Area
    • The Start Line
    • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    • Tech Talk
    • IVA Info
    • X-Cars
    • WSCC Members Only Area
    • Membership Info & Help
  • Out & About With Your Westfield
    • Local Area Meets, Events & Kit Car Shows
    • Speed Series / Hill Climbing / Racing
    • Track Days
    • Places to Visit and Road Trips
  • Club Member Adverts
    • Cars for Sale
    • Cars Wanted
    • Parts for Sale
    • Parts Wanted
  • External and Non-Club Member Adverts
    • External Adverts
  • Chat & General Information
    • Stuff & Nonsense

Calendars

  • Speed Series Events Calendar
  • WSCC Local Events Calendar
  • WSCC Events Calendar

Product Groups

  • WSCC Membership
  • WSCC Speed Series
  • Club Publications
  • WSCC Track Days
  • Admin Only (No Products)
    • Previous Sprint Events
    • Previous Track Days
    • Previous Merchandise

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Facebook


Skype


Car Details


My Location

Found 9 results

  1. AdgeC

    Sport 250 Sump Change

    Presume Tech Talk is the place for this? Posted with apologies to non 250 owners for the long diatribe. For fellow 250 owners interested in fitting a shallow sump, below is a guide that may be useful. I make no claims that this is THE way to do it, just the way that worked for me, following advice gratefully received from Steve sdh2903. WESTFIELD SPORT 250 - FORD ECOBOOST 2.0L SHALLOW SUMP FIT Parts. Needed:- A) Sump Pan - Pt No. N418752 from Power Torque Engineering - £249 inc del. B) Oil Pump Pickup (called Screen & Cover by Ford!) - Pt No. 5110434 + Gasket (seal) from local Ford dealer - £39.80 C) Balance Shaft Delete Kit - Ford Ecoboost/2.3L Mazda MZR - Various suppliers, got mine from PMP (Performance Mazda Parts) - £52.52 D) Sump Plug (M14 X 1.5) - (Existing Ecoboost different size) - Various suppliers, got mine from Opie Oils, Gold Magnetic Sump Plug AP-08 - £13.54 E) Timing Chain cover bolts (M6 X 20 + washers - 4off) - (Existing bolts too long) - Basic 8.8 bolts, nothing fancy. F) 5L engine oil + Oil Filter (MANN W77 or equivalent) - Various suppliers, got oil from Ford - £28.93 and filter from Eurocarparts - £6.49 (Since bought for £3.25 on offer!) G) Loctite 243 Threadlock, Loctite 5910 Gasket Sealant, or similar. Total cost £352.48 excluding consumables (M6 X 20 bolts, threadlock and sealant). Following my experience, would advise carefully inspecting sump for porosity before fitting. Also washed out sump using hot water, washing up liquid and bottle brush to get under baffles (as advised by SBD in sump change info!). Removed an amount of fine "grit"! From information gleaned (and generously given) appears sump can be changed without loosening engine to bellhousing bolts. However, the sump is effectively sandwiched between timing chain cover and bellhousing. The sump seals oil wise at the front against vertical face of the timing chain cover, and horizontal face of underside of block along sides, and and steel "bridge" across the rear. Rear of sump seal flange also protrudes into bellhousing, so sump needs to be tilted front to back to remove/refit. In order to reduce risk of oil leak, I decided to loosen engine to bellhousing bolts to create a couple of mm gap between the two (Ford manual states you can separate them by up to 5mm on the Focus). Took a number of days to complete my sump change, so I nipped up couple of bellhousing bolts each side, at end of each day, rather than risk problems with engine/gearbox engagement, if hoist "relaxed". I used an engine hoist to just support the weight of the rear of the engine, and maintain the gap even, top to bottom. PITA as hoist legs obstruct somewhat access under the car. I positioned hoist at full extension, from rear o/s to try and minimise obstruction! Sump change can be done single handed, but second pair of hands makes life much easier for sump removal, balance shaft removal, and reassembly. Particularly so if you're as lucky as me and have an engineering minded friend, who's keen to help (so much easier than having to explain every step of the way!). Procedure I used is below: Sump Removal:- 1. Lift and support the car so you can get free access to the sump. Removing front wheels improves access. 2. Drain oil from sump (~5L). 3. Loosen and remove all sump bolts, 4 timing cover, 2 (cap head bolts) bell-housing, 13 through sump. 4. Rig and support rear of engine on hoist, to just take weight. 5. Remove any "bits" (air inlet pipework in my case) required to access bellhousing bolts from engine bay! 6. Slacken engine to bellhousing bolts, crack them initially, then loosen evenly and separate by a couple of mm. I used a spacer each side to maintain gap (make sure spacer can't fall inside bellhousing!). 7. Carefully break the seal between the sump and block, pry bars can be used in some positions. Managed to start sump moving using timber lever on o/s lip of sump. Try and lever square, I was worried about cracking timing cover! 8. Work around the sump flange with the pry bars, very gently, taking care not to damage seal face until the sump is free and can be lowered. 9. Photographed joint face for sealant position reference, old sump also provides this. 10. Clean off all the old black sealant from the mating surfaces of the block, using plastic scraper and then white spirit. Note that the steel "bridge" at the back of the block in front of the flywheel comes with a plastic type layer already applied, clean carefully. 11. Clean off the old sealant from the timing cover surface in the same way. 12. Clean sealant and threadlock from bolts being reused. Run tap in all bolt holes, again to clean threadlock residue. Sump removed Front end, timing chain cover and oil p/p and drive Rear end, steel "bridge" and plastic seal face. Balance Shaft Assembly:- 1. Slacken 4 bolts, lower and remove. Take care weighs 8.2kg, quite a lump. 2. Check no shims present under mounting feet positions up inside block. 3. Leave in tray for oil to drain out. 4. Allow oil to run out of supply port up inside block. You know have a precision made lump of Ford engineering for mantelpiece! 5. Apply threadlock to cap head bolt (spring washer supplied with my kit). Fit balance shaft delete kit to blank oil port. Torque cap head bolt to 40Nm. Delete kit Delete kit fitted Oil Pump Pickup:- Mounting bolt spacing is 2mm less, and seal face bore is 2mm less on new pickup. I drilled out the mounting holes by 1mm. This allowed pickup to fit. I also carefully opened out seal face bore from 16mm to ~ 18mm (or as near as can be achieved, without compromising seal groove) to match oil pump inlet using Dremel. Take great care at all stages of pickup modification to keep internals clean. 1. Unbolt and remove existing oil pump pickup and seal (gasket as Ford list it). 2. Power Torque provide dimensions for shortening (70mm from underside of block face) and profiling new pickup. I checked internal depth of new sump local to pickup position - 70mm! Decided to give2-3mm clearance. Once length established, trial fit pickup, and using straight edges across underside of block, measure and mark pickup tube accordingly. 3. Cut pickup tube carefully, and profile narrow faces. Modified oil pickup Option: I opted to trial fit pickup, and then offered sump up into place, to check/sort: a) It fitted. b) Work out best way to offer up without wiping too much sealant from timing chain cover seal face. c) All bolts fitted without bottoming out. Sump wouldn't fit initially, horizontal baffle plate pickup cut out, rear edge fouling on pickup tube. Confirmed by measurement. Consulted Power Torque, suggested relieving baffle, limited to how much could be removed by adjacent vertical baffle. Dressing carried out, clearance achieved by measurement. Sump washed out again, and trial fitted. Success, slid up into place! Horizontal baffle fouling on pickup Baffle dressed back 4. Final clean pickup immediately prior to assembly. I used air line, and workshop vacuum. 5. Apply thin smear of sealant to pickup joint face, and fit seal in groove. 6. Apply threadlock to bolts. Fit pickup into place, and bolt up. Torque bolts to 10Nm Sump installation:- 1. Apply a thin bead of sealant to engine seal faces, with ring around each bolt hole (Ford manual states 3mm bead). 2. Apply threadlock to bolts. 3. Feed the rear of the sump in towards the bellhousing, then raise the front, taking care to minimise wiping sealant off timing chain cover seal face. 4. Insert 4 sump bolts into the block to secure sump, then insert remaining 9, wind up evenly to draw the sump up into place. Manual states, finger tight only at this stage! I nipped them up with socket, to ensure sump up square, but bolts not fully tightened. 5. Insert the 4 (20mm M6) timing chain cover bolts (plus washers),nip up evenly, Torque the 4 bolts to 10Nm 6. Loose fit bellhousing sump cap head bolts. 7. Torque the sump bolts evenly (start at middle each side, and work forward and back, side to side) to 20Nm. 8. Remove spacers, and evenly pull up bellhousing to block bolts. 9. Remove engine support rigging, and hoist. 10. Tighten bellhousing to block bolts to 48Nm Access to some very difficult so "calibrated muscles" utilised! 11. Torque the bellhousing to sump cap head bolts to 20Nm. 12. Reinstate any "bits" removed to access bellhousing bolts from engine bay! 13. Check that a bead of sealant has extruded all round from between the mating surfaces (peace of mind check!). 14. Change oil filter. Note: Left sealant for few hours to ensure fully cured, before oil fill! 13. Refill with oil, (took just on 5L) 14. Start engine, carefully watching oil pressure on initial engine spin, and check for leaks! Note: Could take very conservative approach and electrically disconnect fuel pump, and check oil pressure before going for engine start if so desired. 15. Fit wheels, remove supports, lower to ground. Test drive, in the knowledge your sump is no longer the nearest thing to the road on the underside of your car. I believe you may feel some more vibration through the car, but that may be my imagination, as hadn't driven the car forward a while before doing the sump change, due to crap winter weather! I didn't find it a particularly complicated job, once I got my head round having to take my shiny new engine apart! Hope this helps others considering doing similar, please shot with any queries.
  2. It Almost Looks Like A Car

    Raceline Sump (SOLD Subject to full payment)

    For Sale - Raceline Sump for 1.8 Silvertop/MT75 gearbox (or Balcktop with purchase of new baffle tray from Raceline) Good condition all round, no grounding scratches etc. I have given it a good clean, Sale includes both sump plugs, finger filter, pickup pipe, pick up o-ring and baffle plate. Further info and ftting instructions: http://www.raceline.co.uk/products/part_section.asp?SectionID=40&CategoryID=2 Only selling due to new engine having one already fitted. Pick up from near Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire or postage at cost. £270 ono Lots more pics available
  3. Just passing this along after an eMail conversation with Simon at WF confirming the warranty on my engine. "The warranty on the complete kit is one year from the date of collection, this is the warranty offered by our suppliers." I was asking about the engine clearance of the sump on the 250 as well as the cooling and the response, apart from the std "we don't see a problem" pointed to the fact that they cannot make changes to the engine as it voids the warranty from there suppliers which I kind of understand from a commercial PoV. I personally have decided that the cooling mod from Steve and AdgeC I'm going to fit right now as I have already done a lot of the prep work, so ordered those 2 parts yesterday from BurtonPower, but will likely leave the sump until post IVA, possibly over the winter. Sort of understand a 1 year warranty, which is a standard with just about everything these days, but given the time taken to actually build a kit I would guess is around a year (has been for me and I'm quite dedicated) before your in a position to even start the engine in a chassis on axle stands, a bit annoying. If it took you a year and then you found a major problem deep in the engine you would be pretty p******** off. Just passing the info on
  4. Mark (smokey mow)

    SOLD - MX5 Mazda SDV Sump Baffle

    Based on the Maruha baffle design this will fit the sump of either the 1.6 or 1.8 MX5's to hopefully help retain the oil around the pick-up pipe. I designed this for a standard uncut sump and it fits below the standard baffles but it could also possibly be shortened for a cut-sump. I had two spares made in addition to one for my own car and this is the last spare. The Viton Rubber Flaps shown in some of the pictures are not included but these can be bought from ebay etc. Some minor fettling will be required to make this fit as the slots could benefit from being enlarged slightly to ease fitting the Viton flaps. £25 posted to any UK address - NOW SOLD
  5. chris parkin

    Backtop raceline sump gasket

    I've had a leak on the engine over the weekend, stripped the sump to find the raceline sump gasket with a section missing. Fortunately I've found it and I'm certain there's nothing missing so been extremely lucky on that one. Obviously not sure if I've nipped the seal on the way in and caused the damage or if it's been a dodgy gasket, but either way when I ordered last time it took nearly two weeks to arrive from raceline. My question is, does the standard gasket work or is this a raceline specific part? I have just phoned Ford and they want £65+VAT for a replacement which is outrageous and if I can't gaurentee fitment I'm not taking the risk. what are my options?
  6. Raceline wet sump for a 2000cc duratec engine Incredibly rare to find used. Taken from a speed series car being upgraded to dry sump. Photos show cleanliness of sump after oil drained only no internal cleaning done. Includes dip stick kit New cost £504 inc VAT £350.00 + postage although collection preferred Can be taken to stonleigh sun or mon or delivery can be arranged along M1 M25 corridor from Northampton to Swanley
  7. 7heaven

    2.0 Blacktop Engine parts

    For sale are a series of Blacktop 2.0 Zetec used parts in good condition. My original plan was to recondition and tune the engine, but instead I bought a complete, new unit, so all these parts are now surplus to requirements. (Prices in Brackets are the current new prices at Burton Motorsport) Blacktop Raceline Sump - Exhaust side starter motor £250 (£532) Sold to CRAIG R Blacktop Raceline Water rail - including fitting kit and thermostat & housing - £150 (£285) Sold to Kernow Still for Sale Starter Motor -Exhaust side £50 (£156) Flywheel & Clutch assembly £50 ( ) Blacktop Rocker cover £20 Ignition Coil Pack and leads £30 (£80) Cylinder head & Std Cams £100 (£160 surcharge for cylinder exchange, Cams ??) Block, rods, pistons & crank - make an offer Currently all the remaining bits are bolted together, but I am not selling it as a 'runner' - just as spares or for reconditioning. If you want all the rest of it, it's yours for £200 - collection only from Norfolk please. (Happy to post bits) Any questions please PM me. Thanks Jason
  8. linky1967

    Redtop Sump Leaking

    Hi, Some advice please? It seems like my sump is leaking from the gasket on my Red-top engine. It has a cast shallow sump and looks like a cork gasket fitted (although I cant be certain without a closer look - cant be certain what baffle is has fitted either) I would appreciate some advice on the best way to go when I come to fix it 1. Cork gasket(s) - with/without baffle plate! 2. Rubber gasket slotted to accept the baffle plate 3. Gasket and baffle plate combined Recommendations on goods suppliers also welcome Sealant/no sealant? Thanks
  9. evobat

    Fuel tank sump

    Hi all, I'm about to get a new fuel tank made with a sump in the middle to stop fuel surge. Is there a recommended size to have the sump?. I have had 3 different answers from 3 different tank makers. !, a large square type that will fit between the chassis (190mm x 150 x 70 deep) 2, a small round type (100mm dia x 65 deep) 3, round type and baffled pot (100mm dia x 70 deep) I was told that if the sump is too large then i would still get fuel surge. As my old tank has had it i thought i would do away with external swirl pot and low pressure pump and use a sumped tank.
×

Important Information

Please review our Terms of Use, Guidelines and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.