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Which are the best oils to use?


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Norman Verona

I've always used Mobil 1. I read an independent report of a BMW used as a taxi in New York. It was jointly owned by two brothers who used it 24 hours a day 6 days a week.

 

It had Mobil 1 which was changed on the due mileage intervals.

 

The engine was stripped in a lab and measurements revealed no appreciable wear. The cam lobes still had the original machining marks.

 

The mileage at this strip down was 320,000 miles.

 

Good enough for me. 

 

ed to add a postscript.

 

Are US miles the same as UK miles?  :)

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Mines a '91 or '92 Redtop, been running fine on 5w/40 (Silkolene Pro S) fully synth.

Without sounding too controversial, how are people judging the oil when they say "been every happy with it", "pleased with the results" etc?   Without side-by-side tests on equal engines which are d

For xflow and (presume pinto) like Valvoline 20w50 mineral oil - not sure what they call it now. BRB.   Here you go:   http://www.burtonpower.com/parts-by-brand/brands-u-to-z/valvoline/valvoline-v

SootySport

I've always used Mobil 1. I read an independent report of a BMW used as a taxi in New York. It was jointly owned by two brothers who used it 24 hours a day 6 days a week.

 

It had Mobil 1 which was changed on the due mileage intervals.

 

The engine was stripped in a lab and measurements revealed no appreciable wear. The cam lobes still had the original machining marks.

 

The mileage at this strip down was 320,000 miles.

 

Good enough for me. 

 

ed to add a postscript.

 

Are US miles the same as UK miles?  :)

They are the same Norman.

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  • 9 months later...

Bumping an older thread...

I now have low ish oil pressure after a run because I topped my xflow up with semi synth 15/30 that I had in the garage.

Looking to do a change and will put the recommended 20w/50 in it.

I can't seem to get Valveoline locally but my local motor factor stock Millers Classic 20w/50 at £29 all in for 5Ltrs

I'm not a very spirited driver, hoping this will do. Any thoughts?

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I'm using Halfords Classic 20w50 in my crossflow, it seems to be fine, so you could try that if you can't get the VR1.

 

Geoff

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Thanks Chaps,

 

I might run on the Millers (just because its 10 mins away) until its next big service and change then flop over onto the Valveoline.

 

But with an Xflow isn't it a bit like a constant rolling oil change, just keep topping it up and eventually most of it will be new :)

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Pistol Pete

From my research Millers oil is very good quality and recommended by SBD and BGH (for gearboxes) and for a xflow its more important that the grade is correct (as in not a thin modern w30 oil - as you have found) rather than the make.

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  • 2 years later...

Morning all.

What engine oil for a dry sumped 1.6CVH. Fully gas flowed head, lifters, vernier etc, the bottom Is stock.

Also, I know I can work out how much oil it needs from draining it. But that's not a lot of use when I need to buy the oil first. The reservoir is enormous, so I was thinking of getting about 10ltrs and having a few ltr spare for topping up if needed. Thoughts?

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andy665

On my 5.1 V8 I was really not sure what to use. Although its a high spec engine its essentially an old engine design so spoke to the builders (V8 developments), Opie and the technical team at Millers who got the full engine spec from me

Was advised to use Millers Nanaodrive CFS 10w60 NT+, certainly not cheap but I have never objected to buying a high quality oil - prevention is better than cure

 

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Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary
On 17/06/2017 at 07:39, TomV said:

Morning all.

What engine oil for a dry sumped 1.6CVH. Fully gas flowed head, lifters, vernier etc, the bottom Is stock.

Also, I know I can work out how much oil it needs from draining it. But that's not a lot of use when I need to buy the oil first. The reservoir is enormous, so I was thinking of getting about 10ltrs and having a few ltr spare for topping up if needed. Thoughts?

Hi Tom,

I can't help you with the grade for that particular engine, but it might be worth putting a photo of the dry sump tank your car uses up, so that it can be identified.

- Certainly do measure how much comes out, but as some oil is often left around the system, it won't be a 100% definitive. Different size tanks, naturally, hold different amounts. But the critical bit, is that different dry sump tanks should be filled to different levels.

Its one of those things that is so far out of the comfort zone of normal car ownership, that unless you've come across them before, or been told/shown, isn't intuitive and not something you'd just know.

A good dry sump tank can be quite a complex "simple" structure, and is intended to carry out a number of functions, not just hold oil - it's why they often look so big! Generally speaking, to work properly, they're supposed to be part empty, typically, only about two thirds full or so, with the engine running.

Thats because the whole shape of the tank and layout of hoses designed to spin the returning oil all around the sides, of the top section, de-aerating it - getting rid of all the fine bubbles of air, trapped in it, from its passage through the engine and pumps.

Often, if you look inside, there will be a horizontal baffle about a third down from the top, (helps stop the oil sloshing around), many often fill to that level.

Not sure if you know the process, but the oil level on a dry sumped car is normally checked with the engine running, there's not normally a dipstick or sight glass, it's just a case of unscrewing the DS tank's cap, and checking where the top of the oil level is.

(When the engine is stopped, some oil from the tank tends to drain back into the engine, somthe tank level can look artificially low).

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Thrustyjust

I would do some research on what oil on CVH , as hydraulic followers can pump up with too thick a grade oil. Saying that, Ford used to all use 20w50 in those days, so it probably is that. If so, the Valvolene racing 20w50 is cheap and damn good stuff.

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Thanks for the comprehensive answers, really useful stuff. I'll get some pics of the reservoir up soon. Tom

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the stoat
On ‎25‎/‎06‎/‎2017 at 01:04, Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary said:

Hi Tom,

I can't help you with the grade for that particular engine, but it might be worth putting a photo of the dry sump tank your car uses up, so that it can be identified.

- Certainly do measure how much comes out, but as some oil is often left around the system, it won't be a 100% definitive. Different size tanks, naturally, hold different amounts. But the critical bit, is that different dry sump tanks should be filled to different levels.

Its one of those things that is so far out of the comfort zone of normal car ownership, that unless you've come across them before, or been told/shown, isn't intuitive and not something you'd just know.

A good dry sump tank can be quite a complex "simple" structure, and is intended to carry out a number of functions, not just hold oil - it's why they often look so big! Generally speaking, to work properly, they're supposed to be part empty, typically, only about two thirds full or so, with the engine running.

Thats because the whole shape of the tank and layout of hoses designed to spin the returning oil all around the sides, of the top section, de-aerating it - getting rid of all the fine bubbles of air, trapped in it, from its passage through the engine and pumps.

Often, if you look inside, there will be a horizontal baffle about a third down from the top, (helps stop the oil sloshing around), many often fill to that level.

Not sure if you know the process, but the oil level on a dry sumped car is normally checked with the engine running, there's not normally a dipstick or sight glass, it's just a case of unscrewing the DS tank's cap, and checking where the top of the oil level is.

(When the engine is stopped, some oil from the tank tends to drain back into the engine, somthe tank level can look artificially low).

Dave is spot on, but I want to clarify one point, by checking the oil with the engine running this means at idle if my experience is anything to go by.  If one blips the throttle the additional flow velocity can create a fountain if there is no lid on the tank! :rolleyes:

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Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary
37 minutes ago, the stoat said:

Dave is spot on, but I want to clarify one point, by checking the oil with the engine running this means at idle if my experience is anything to go by.  If one blips the throttle the additional flow velocity can create a fountain if there is no lid on the tank! :rolleyes:

:laugh:

Aye, I can only imagine the hilarity that ensue's from that one! But yes, Mr Stoat is quite right, don't rev the throttle with the tanks cap off!

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