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Steve (sdh2903)

Conservatory roof/insulation.

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We have a largish conservatory approx 7m x 4m. Now it's great for 6 months of the year primarily used for the kids and the dog. But we're getting to the time of year where it's becoming too cold to use and sucks the heat from the downstairs. It does have electric underfloor heating but it costs a fortune to run and we've even naughtily put in a big vertical rad but even that is peeing in the wind.

Googling brings up loads of companies offering to swap for a lightweight tiled roof and some insulating. Battening and plastering. Now we had a quote of 7k for the tiled roof option which is too dear. If spending big money I'd rather knock the thing down and build a proper extension.

So has anyone had any experience of 'winterising' or done any diy solutions? I'm nervous of the plasterboarding option as that's a lot of extra weight up there. Especially if it snows aswell.

Or am I generally peeing in the wind in the hope of using all year round?

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We just had a new one built with a Livin Roof. Full width of the house and has the insulation required to enable us to knock through to it. Significantly more than 7k mind, but it really is just a room with lots of windows now rather than what was effectively a glass outbuilding that happened to be attached. I'd vote for throwing lots of money at it :d

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If you want a DIY job then Celotex or Rectacell rigid foam insulation either wedged or double sided tape depending on the design of your roof

Cuts easy with a hand saw and is light weight -

https://www.travisperkins.co.uk/Recticel-Eurothane-General-Purpose-Insulation-Board-2400mm-x-1200mm/p/9000196435

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I'd got my measurements wrong aswell. It's 5m x 4m ish.

I had thought of sticking insulation up but then I'd still need to batten and cover it with something? 

Here's some pics. Just ignore how manky it is. It's on my list.....

20181011_155141-2016x1512.thumb.jpg.250a6c5e6361ca547bdac5430b0bdb2a.jpg20181011_155125-2016x1512.thumb.jpg.fbaab1296a3ebdd2b43081723169922d.jpg20181011_155325-2016x1512.thumb.jpg.eaac51fe528b6ab2451385f1cfe816a2.jpg

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If glass is old cheapest improvement will be new glass which is a lot more thermally efficient, as friends of ours did.

Ours is the old plastic and frames are old too and we're contemplating having an Ultraframe roof.

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15 minutes ago, Dave (OnliestSmeg) - Manchester AO said:

If glass is old cheapest improvement will be new glass which is a lot more thermally efficient, as friends of ours did.

Ours is the old plastic and frames are old too and we're contemplating having an Ultraframe roof.

It's only around 6 years old. And the guy we bought the house from was the md of the double glazing firm who built it. It's supposedly very expensive double glazed self cleaning glass.

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11 minutes ago, Steve (sdh2903) said:

It's only around 6 years old. And the guy we bought the house from was the md of the double glazing firm who built it. It's supposedly very expensive double glazed self cleaning glass.

Oh :(

that might push us more towards an insulated roof.

We cannot use ours Winter as too cold & Summer as too hot!

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22 minutes ago, Dave (OnliestSmeg) - Manchester AO said:

Oh :(

that might push us more towards an insulated roof.

We cannot use ours Winter as too cold & Summer as too hot!

Ours is great in summer which is why I suspect it is a decent glass as it doesn't overheat. I know we're in Scotland but even in the hot early summer it was very pleasant in there. It's just the winter that's a pain.

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Seen a few examples of this kind of diy approach.

76791843.jpg.c4b48f679f13d9299f309dd970ddb66f.jpg

But it's the weight that bothers me. All the rafters plus plaster board at 20kg a sheet. Although one wall is brick and the rest is bearing on the frame rather than the roof. 

Also suspect a bit of sagging over a span of 4m?

The other thing I thought was a suspended type ceiling with ally frameworks. Might look a bit office like but may do the job

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1 hour ago, Steve (sdh2903) said:

Seen a few examples of this kind of diy approach.

76791843.jpg.c4b48f679f13d9299f309dd970ddb66f.jpg

But it's the weight that bothers me. All the rafters plus plaster board at 20kg a sheet. Although one wall is brick and the rest is bearing on the frame rather than the roof. 

Also suspect a bit of sagging over a span of 4m?

The other thing I thought was a suspended type ceiling with ally frameworks. Might look a bit office like but may do the job

The bigger issue with the roof in that photo would be condensation.

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The guy did say he used a vapor barrier but it still has to go somewhere?

Mine has vents all along the top of the wall units ie above the height of any potential ceiling. But I've no idea if these vents are enough or not?

We've been talking about a full width extension and getting shot of it but would be a couple of years more saving to do it.

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Last year I converted my upvc/glass conservatory into a sun lounge.  Like you I was attracted to some of the roofing systems currently advertised which provide for a quick and relatively easy installation.  However, after carrying out further research, I discovered that some of these can be problematic from a planning perspective.  The “rules” for a conservatory are more relaxed than for a normal building and if a new roof is erected without the necessary planning conditions having been met, difficulties could arise if you wish to sell your property at a later stage. 

In the end I ended up demolishing the old conservatory but retained the walls and floor.  New upvc windows and doors were added and the roof insulated in accordance with current building regulations and covered with slates.  I didn’t require Planning Permision but needed a Building Warrant.  It was also a planning requirement that I obtained a structural engineer to provide a report on the suitability of the proposed roof.  All this of course added to the cost and took time but I have ended up with a superior buiding fit for purpose all year round.  Living in the NE of Scotland, where Summers can be short, I would have no hesitation in recommending the conversion.  Not only has it improved the utilisation of the room but has added value to the property.

So if you decide to go ahead just make sure that whatever you do, doesn’t fall foul of the planners.

 

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Cheers @Nickietam I feel that none of the solutions that I can find will satisfy building regs fully and not invalidate my building warrant/completion cert. Although if I fit a suspended aluminium grid ceiling it's not really changing the roof. And should we decide to sell up then it could be removed in a couple of hours. Quick estimates are less than 500 quid all in. But I just don't really know how effective it will be or if I'm going to have damp stained tiles in a few months.

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@Steve (sdh2903) I've seen several of the different systems in my day job (building control) and if done right there's no reason why they can't be built to pass the Building Regulations approval  (which would be required BTW) and then be fully legal but to do so you need to think about all aspects of the roof. That is to say that if you are insulating then you also need to consider the potential condensation risk and therefore ventilation. Likewise the existing roof structure was only designed to carry lightweight panels so any works or insulation could significantly increase structural loading onto the glazing frames.

i've seen two roofs today but both very different in their design and approach. The first was a guardian roof system whist the second involved removing all the existing roof structure and replacing with timber and lightweight composite slates.

  • Thanks 1

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