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corsechris

Non-Westfield build

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corsechris

Given I will eventually rock up at Stoneleigh in this and probably expect to park on the club pitch, I suppose I should post a bit on here about my latest build project.

I do very little to the Westfield other than basic servicing as it just works, and Vickie (who owns it) is perfectly happy with it as it is, so no mods are likely, meaning very little tinkering time was to be had on the Westy. I had sworn off more kit builds some time ago, but found myself wandering the interwebs one day and came across this:

www.midlana.com

I don't much care for the name, but other than that, it appealed. I'd never done a 'locost' style build before, although my last build could barely qualify as a kit given how much of it was missing and the fact the company went bust shortly after I acquired the 4th hand pile of junk I started with. I had done chassis mods before, but never a full build so it was a bit of a leap of faith, or perhaps ignorance.

Anyhoo, decision made, first step was to pick a donor for the engine. My previous build used an Alfa V6 and my daily driver at the time was an Alfa 166, so that was one decision made. Donor 166 acquired and 'processed'.

5a2bca2318f02_166assemblykit.thumb.jpg.d2fd10f957ec5bb5e4ac1f2e7d540b8b.jpg

 

I did the same exercise with an MX5 as the car uses the uprights, brakes and steering rack (and possibly column). I looked at the options and it was cheaper to buy a whole car, plus I got to pick and choose which other bits to keep that might be useful later on. I sold the soft top for what I paid for the car, so that was handy.

 

donor.thumb.jpg.f16cc4fe4c2c19aa8adf8bc21b56df22.jpg

 

After tidying the mess, which involved a few trips to the tip and funny looks from the staff as I chucked large chunks of car into the scrap metal skip, there was a bit of a hiatus while I spent some time on other stuff. I finally got started on preparing the donor parts earlier this year. I wanted all the major parts to be cleaned up & ready to go so I didn't have to endlessly mess with filthy bits of old car.

Donor engine was first. I didn't want to get into stripping it for a number of reasons. Mainly budget, this was supposed(!) to be a budget build, and given how expensive these engines get once you start to mess with them, I was determined to do the bare minimum to it. It's a solid engine so I just did basic service items like cam belt & tensioner & idlers, oil seals, water pump & plugs. Second reason was I plan on using the OEM ECU and although they can be re-mapped to take advantage of mods, again, it gets spendy very quickly. Other than cleaning, painting & plating, I also put new boots and sleeving on the upper engine loom.

Before:

5a2bcd3dca06c_Donorengine.jpeg.3270afa6c89036b760f4f3646b7c35b3.jpeg

 

After:

5a2bcd3f106b1_Enginemostlyready.thumb.jpeg.4167effaf6cb7eb0a075da5bf0badd3c.jpeg

 

And the gearbox:

5a2bcd42e4e39_gearboxreadysmall.thumb.jpg.cedeef51902df6d53d1ac03527cc19d2.jpg

 

Process was to strip down and remove auxiliary bits, plug all holes, jet wash sandblast to remove crud, rinse, dry, paint. I completely stripped the gearbox to make that process a bit easier. For the steel parts like brackets and bolts, I used the small sandblasting cabinet to get them back to base steel then a DIY zinc plating kit to protect them. Pretty happy with how that worked actually.

 

5a2bcd3d37983_DIYzincplating.thumb.jpeg.09b411b5a7ab70eb7ae0fa1d231676d1.jpeg

 

The suspension uprights and brake parts from the MX5 looked like they had been recovered from the seafloor so I used the washing soda electrolysis method for those. Don't seem to have any pictures of that stage - shame really as the results are excellent.

Having got the main donor parts sorted, it was time to make a build table.......

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garytipping

The Alfa engine is a thing of beauty!

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Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary
9 minutes ago, garytipping said:

The Alfa engine is a thing of beauty!

It sure is!

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stephenh

It is now it's been cleaned. This looks like being a seriously professional build. Looking forward to seeing it develop.

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corsechris

Build table was interesting. I'd considered a few options but a fellow builder in Oz was ahead of me in the process and has used steel wall studding for the structure. Seemed like a good idea so I copied it. The size of the table was important too. After much angst, I opted for 10' x 5'. An expensive choice given I wanted to do the top & bottom in single pieces of MDF, not a jigsaw, but in the grand scheme, worth it I suppose.

Frame first. This was 50mm x 4mm angle with 50mm x 3mm square legs and some smaller angle for bracing. Adjustable feet for levelling.

5a2bd33953a18_Tablelegs.thumb.jpeg.470cf50aa3311acf3d9e130c5e5dfb7c.jpeg

 

Inner structure. This was two pieces of steel studding interlocked to make a box. The extra density at the back is to help carry the weight of the power unit.

5a2bd338540f5_Tableinnerstructure.thumb.jpeg.edca2c3a6c09aa98e2e0b887c993dccf.jpeg

 

And done.

5a2bd3374d539_TaDahTableready.thumb.jpeg.18478cde8e59a20d140d4e53448304d0.jpeg

Flushed with that success.....it was time to start for real. The author of the book I'm following is keen to point out that the design is a base - modify to suit you own ideas. I knew I was pushing things a bit with the Alfa V6 as its a big old lump so had planned to make the rear 'engine compartment' a bit longer than the book design and to increase the wheelbase a bit to accommodate that. These are the sorts of things you really ned to decide before cutting metal.....

Initial stages of the build were really enjoyable for some reason. Not quite sure why I enjoyed this bit so much. Should probably get out more.

Tube number 1!!

 

 

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Growing fast now...

5a2bd493d939a_5tubesdonecopy.thumb.jpg.a4ccd8c144bafa17e6854333d67c3de6.jpg

The basic floor frame.

5a2bd53be1431_Basetubes1.thumb.jpeg.7fc7c9dde1a7bcc50c4e87c4ecb16e47.jpeg

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Once I was happy with the basic frame, it was tacked then flipped in the jig blocks and seam welded. Welds had to be ground flat (never ideal) so it could be flipped back up the other way and still stay flat on the table. Rest of frame was fully welded and generally was fine, although I did have one area that tipped up badly enough after welding to need cutting and re-welding. At this stage, it was still flat and still fitted in the jog blocks either way up without any trouble. To say I was both relieved and pleased would be an understatement as I was expecting serious grief with weld distortion.

Having got the base frame done, it was time to start it growing out of the table. I got the main cage hoops bent professionally as there was no way I could bend 38mm thick wall CDS. I picked a cage design that was a bit easier to fabricate than the book, and arguably one that is a bit weaker too, but I think it'll suffice for what I intend doing with the car. The tubes between A and B hoops were my design, inspired by a few others I've seen.

 

Base tubes 3.jpeg

Base tubes 5.jpeg

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Rory's Dad

Magic :)

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corsechris

Sorry, those last two shots are kind of superfluous....

Anyhoo, onward & upward.

B hoop.

Hoopy.thumb.jpeg.d53aeb49122081f024b6a68a9add8a66.jpeg

 

The basic A & B hoops plus 'roof' tubes.

5a2bd97f6f0b8_Tackedcagetop.thumb.jpeg.c7deb8fbeece50f5a59baeecb73c2f3f.jpeg

 

The design I went with involved some funky angles at times. When contemplating this build, I had fretted about how to take care of the tube joints and in the end, stumped up the cash for a JD2 tube notcher. I am so glad I did - what a brilliant tool that is. A joint at 144 degrees between two 38mm tubes. That this is as good as it is is entirely down to how good that tool is. I had to get a bit creative with it at times as its only really supposed to work up to about 45 degrees. Same could be said for the saw I'm using for straight cuts too. Its a cheap Rage brand compound mitre saw I bought some time back for household DIY. It's a bit cheap and nasty in places so before starting this build I spent a bit of time trying to improve it a bit. The main problem was with the main pivot - it had tons of play so getting reliable accurate cuts was tricky. After stripping it down, I figured out how to fit some ball races rather than the badly fitting plain pin and that helped a lot.

5a2bd97d3ce75_144degreejoint.thumb.jpeg.92c3e1a4dc3e2c0f30463bd6c67813ca.jpeg

 

Having chosen JK seats (thanks for the 'test drive' Dave), there was a bit of a delay while I waited for them to arrive. I had to have them hand in order to make sure I got the upper harness fixings at the right height.

5a2bdb7bc7dad_Rearbulkheadtubes.thumb.jpeg.42be8ca10cb2560b706f4316bc821a67.jpeg

A few people commented about the single brace behind the drivers head looking a bit odd. I agreed,  so fitted one to the passenger side as well. No doubt that'll be visible in some later shots.

 

Something of a digression, but the book design has a DIY fuel tank. The author hated making it and it looked challenging...  Fortunately, someone spotted that an Elise tank is a good fit. Phew.

5a2bdb78cf19f_Lotustank1.thumb.jpeg.8be0d35fedaecf25ec7809038fee5ea9.jpeg

Somehow I ended up with two of these, so the one pictured above has now found its way to Seattle for another builder to use.

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corsechris

Being a gentleman of leisure now, I was able to get a few hours on the build most days, meaning progress felt reasonably rapid. The early stages really saw it grow fast and were really enjoyable. Back when I decided to build this, I bought a comedy cheap TIG welder as I didn't really know which method to use for this job - MIG or TIG. As it has turned out, I've been doing both, but more TIG than MIG. I find MIG is great for welds where I have good easy access and TIG is better for the more awkward jobs. This is more a reflection of my lack of skill that anything else I think, but it works for me. I am wishing I'd bought an AC capable TIG though as I'll have some aluminium welding to do eventually and no sensible way to do it at the moment. A problem for another day.

Back to the build...  Having done the basic cage, it was time to put in some structure before moving forwards.

5a2bdf18f0787_Onesidedone.thumb.jpeg.9ac55be551f7ee431ee092d09416d944.jpeg

5a2bdf176f375_Rearview.thumb.jpeg.6c1cdd492f3972e8ed6e4a2fb15bf28b.jpeg

 

First of the front tubes.

5a2bdf14058e3_Viewfromrightrearside.thumb.jpeg.6709186ed27ff1f8fd5ccc7c3c2da0cd.jpeg

 

5a2bdf15a090a_Firstfronttubesin.thumb.jpeg.2501316477849febb08e3aaabefeb28c.jpeg

 

The large square tube clamped across the middle there was to try and hold down the side rails. Both sides had started to bow up a bit between where the A and B hoops met the side rails. As both sides seemed to do it equally, and both front & back ends have stayed flat on the table, I decided to just live with it in the end rather than trying to fight it. At its worst, there is probably a 3mm gap under those tubes. It doesn't affect anything but it does bug me a bit. The structure is now way past fixing this issue too.

 

 

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corsechris

The book gave a choice of inboard or outboard front spring/damper location. I couldn't see a sensible way to mount them outboard without having a really bad installation angle so opted for the inboard solution. It's more work and more complicated, but it ends up looking tidier and gives an almost perfect 1:1 wheel to damper movement ration, which is good. Because of this, the front structure gets pretty busy. Having put in the main upper forward tubes, the next step was to join them to the bottom. The designer called these 'b***h tubes' as they gave him hard time. I was expecting them to be a swine, but with the benefit of his drawings to work from, actually, they weren't at all hard, just took some time marking up & careful application of the grinder.

5a2be23bbc855_Bitch3.thumb.jpg.cb74bf4337f980ab5daaa51905ea857d.jpg

 

Happy with those, more structure went in. Some awkward to get at welds here, but it was still good fun.

5a2be2394baf5_6moretubes.thumb.jpeg.97267f247cb03a1e39e5666923639754.jpeg

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5a2be235f07ec_7moretubesfrontrightview.thumb.jpeg.2fddd7a7953dee11e2920f4960a697b5.jpeg

This is no lightweight though. The designer used material that allows him to use the car in certain US race formulae and although I could easily have gone thinner, I decided to stick with his choice. My main thought was the thicker material would hopefully give me some extra margin and help flatter my lack of welding skill and experience.

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corsechris

Having reached this stage with all the most basic structure done, I removed the chassis from the table and jig blocks so I could finish-weld all the bits that weren't easily accessible with it flat.

5a2be5b5821ad_Betteraccess.thumb.jpeg.b5e6510d83aa906b882a067ba65c4d35.jpeg

 

That done, and finding it still fitted in the blocks with only a few squeaks of complaint, there then followed some displacement activity while I contemplated the front suspension. It all had to get done eventually, so I moved to sorting out the seat mountings. Mindful of IVA inspectors desire to see solid mountings, and not wanting to have to grovel on the floor to fit or remove seats in future, I came up with a frame arrangement. Again, no doubt OTT and heavy, but I'm happy with it. Hope Mr IVA agrees. Basically, there is a square frame that bolts to the bottom of the seat, this frame then sits in a U section at the back and drops onto an L section at the front, with a bolt each side holding this frame solidly to the crossmember that carries the L section.

Rear U section. Also visible is the 50mm square spine and the lower inner harness mounting boss.

5a2be5b123c33_Rearmount.thumb.jpeg.3b4997fbe1254109b4504407c1bdc862.jpeg

 

Front crossmember and L section. You can just see the head of the bolt on the right side seat. Bolt faces backwards and screws into a boss in the seat support frame.

5a2be5b21598a_Frontmount.thumb.jpeg.190f5b336f2417110754d102be8e2243.jpeg

 

Drivers seat done.

5a2be5b001662_Seatinstalled.thumb.jpeg.f07cad79d8f4e10604e1ca86314867c0.jpeg

 

Next in the grand scheme now that I could sit in the thing without the seat moving was to finalise the pedalbox location, then put in some tubes to hang it from. Wherever possible, I've been putting in threaded bosses so I don't have to mess about with awkward to get at nuts or bolts.

5a2be5ae0ec2d_Pedalboxinplace.thumb.jpeg.b87b8faaeca14e92899d20f680133be6.jpeg

 

Happy with that, steering rack next. This is the MX5 rack. Like all the other donor parts, I spent way too long tarting them up. I messed up a bit with this. The book called for a 1/2" crush tube in the rack mounting rails which I, for some reason, decided should be 1/2" UNF bosses. When I came to fit the rack, I realised my mistake - a 1/2" bolt won't fit. I tried a few solutions but the only proper one was to cut these off, re-make them with M10 threaded bosses and put them back.

5a2be5b4a22aa_Rackanddiagonal.thumb.jpeg.1c3a376688f4703623e6a81f1bcfab57.jpeg

 

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corsechris

Having got seat, pedals and rack located, the next bit was the steering column. Given I intend using the Alfa ECU and had hoped to use (most of) the Alfa loom, I also wanted to use the Alfa steering column and switch gear too. Having previously spent quite some time stripping out the unwanted systems form the donor Alfa loom and getting it pared back to basics for use in the car, I was pretty keen to make this work as it would save me loads of hassle and probably money. The book uses either the MX5 item or a custom one. I knew this would be a bit bulky, but it had benefits.

First step was to see if it would fit at all, and if I could get it where it needed to be. Surprisingly successful.

5a2bea43ae56d_DarthWelder.thumb.jpeg.1cf7fb28416693ffc11023a62498d268.jpeg

 

I was able to use the vital sections of the Alfa column bracket for location, meaning I could retain the rake & reach adjustments. Don't know if this will be easily usable or more of a set and forget job - will wait and see how the dash turns out. I discovered yesterday that having this column where it is has given me a bit of a problem with the dash bottom cross tube, but I'm sure I can come up with something. I'll get to that later.....

5a2bea44cd038_pedalsandcolumnbracket.thumb.jpeg.e728665c543b4403ca575651b1a9883b.jpeg

 

That done, more fiddling with details up front. For added cheapness, I wanted to use the Alfa radiator fan. The rad itself was an Ebay special. I forget what it is for, some hot hatch or other, but it was very reasonable and fits the hole! I managed to graft the Alfa fan shroud onto it and plonked it on the nose. 

Last front tubes:

5a2bea3f4c2f7_Finalfrontdiagonals.thumb.jpeg.c146f5031b899303852ec8e6423ad2c9.jpeg

 

Rad plonked in place. This was a while ago, yesterday I got round to trimming off the excess plastic of the shroud and putting mounting brackets on the chassis. Happy with the result but no picture at the moment.

5a2bea41034c6_Fanshroud.thumb.jpeg.3d7e479392bdda56b1553d2524337973.jpeg

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corsechris

Having run out of excuses, I now had no other option but to start the suspension. This is no different to any other car of the type (built without a jig) and relies on accurately locating the suspension pickup points, rather than trying to build the chassis accurately. The book has a complicated jig for the rear suspension points and I wasn't looking forward to it. Thankfully, again that chap in OZ came to the rescue. As he drives a CAD machine for living, he has been building his car virtually along with physically, and he had designed a set of subframes for the rear suspension. Looking at them, I reckoned I could make them at least as accurately as I could a jig, so opted for that path. Rear suspension is upper wishbone and lower A arm with a forward facing leg. This needs 8 location points at the back and two forward.

Rear upper subframe. The brackets are aimed along the load line so the rod ends have no bending or side loads applied to them.

5a2bed054f7c8_Rearsubframepart1.thumb.jpeg.8f9f55c36dbd239c34898250b0028ed8.jpeg

Brackets. These are a PITA to make, but are a good design I think. Thick stainless washers are welded on the outsides to help strengthen the bracket and also prevent rusting once paint gets chipped off.

5a2bed02ea9d5_Bracketsx4.thumb.jpeg.dab23620fc1424a61b8a58134a09feec.jpeg

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Almost done.

5a2bed0182bc6_Topframealmostdone.thumb.jpeg.07a2fa71064f9ab32f4de28c7e2cc778.jpeg

And done.

5a2bee02a2ae1_Topframecomplete.thumb.jpeg.52710692763184384d3026954d645a2e.jpeg

 

The lower frame has some acute angles and required some 'creative' use of the cutoff saw.....

5a2bee041f62e_Donttrythisathome......thumb.jpeg.8dcfee4e62cc8f130e29004fd2a50303.jpeg

 

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corsechris

The lower frame came out really nicely - the accuracy of the bracket centres was really good. Shame really, As I had to scrap it in the end.

5a2bee84b705f_Rearsubframes.thumb.jpeg.ab5a10a5be22a0afce82f03d71755555.jpeg

 

At this point, I reached an end to what I could do at the back so I had no more excuses left......front suspension.

The book uses two simple jigs to get the front pickup points accurately located relative to the reference lines on the build table. These are easy to make accurately and in theory, easy to use. I carefully made the first. Happy it was as accurate as I was ever going to get it (I was unable to find any errors!) I then used that as a jig to make the second one. They are a 'goalpost' that sits over the front chassis with the upper mount points on tabs, with a cross piece that bolts in with holes for the lower brackets. They have to be two-piece or you can't fit them. The idea is to accurately place them, clamp them to the chassis then make the brackets fit between the jig and wherever the chassis happened to end up. For the front brackets, which are square-on, this worked great. For the rear brackets, I wanted to aim them at the balljoints so they wouldn't have side loads. This was a bit of a challenge involving extra jigs, rod ends and lots of time. An easier option would have been to use brackets with a vertical bolt axis, but you'd still need to do some translation so it would still be fiddly.

5a2bf0c02358e_Jig1.thumb.jpeg.20b0979169b7a616d98b36da947b9fea.jpeg

 

The red laser lines on the jig & chassis are from a cheap laser level projector I bought last year to do some tiling - it has been incredibly useful on this build.

5a2bf0c671092_Jig2.thumb.jpeg.ca594212b6bce5b71d196454982bd87f.jpeg

 

First one done. 7 more to go.....

5a2bf0c2561de_Yay-onedown.thumb.jpeg.7e0e08aee69f666d9d593083f3abc4ce.jpeg

 

 

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corsechris

The front brackets went pretty easily. The rear ones....

First assemble jig with a rod end installed, spaced correctly back from the front bracket. Adjust the height and location of the second jig so the rod end is accurately held in place, then remove the original jigs.

5a2bf1e16b164_step1.thumb.jpeg.68d93523ff063e9e587bfa0f67b4f08e.jpeg

 

Rotate the rod end through 90 degrees, then add another jig with two rod ends, one each side of the first one.

5a2bf1df499eb_step2.thumb.jpeg.346c7b84eee9898b6476cb0e75b0e21d.jpeg

While the second jig holds the place, move the first one so that the joint aims along the line to the outer balljoint centre.....

5a2bf1dc7cb42_step3.thumb.jpeg.24fd19abac7b1d4e8739af997e50a287.jpeg

 

Finally remove the second jig, rotate the joint back 90 degrees and you have the joint correctly located in place and aiming the right direction. Allegedly. From there, fabricate a bracket.

5a2bf1da09936_step4.thumb.jpeg.aa860fbae3099a3b2d67ff40afd02d8c.jpeg

I did both sides, then decided I really didn't like what I had come up with. Because I was now aiming the rod ends, the bracket needed to be further back and I hadn't allowed for that. Having removed both brackets and cleaning up the mess, I had a choice of either moving this chassis tube, and the 14 others associated with it, adding a bunch more, or narrowing the base of the wishbones a bit. I opted for that. I think it ended up at about 30mm off the original figure. I'll live with that.

This is what I removed. Hated it even as I was doing it.

 

The next effort was much more like it.

5a2bf41169b6c_Lowerfrontbracket3.thumb.jpeg.b9d4bd133998c7c337eb719379648255.jpeg

 

The rest of the rear brackets were pretty much the same. Tweaking the base of the wishbones was easy enough at this stage, given I hadn't actually made them yet. Just had to adjust the jig dimensions.

 

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corsechris

Having done the brackets, which felt like penance for something. I was pretty happy with how they turned out. Again, as accurately as I was able to measure, they came out right.

As a reward, wishbones next. There's a theme developing here, that bloke in Oz. He had some parts laser cut for his build and due to a miscommunication, had ended up with enough parts to make 10 sets of front wishbones. I grabbed a set of the plate parts used to make the lower balljoint 'box'. It uses the original MX5 lower balljoint so you have to replicate the horizontal and vertical fixings. The lower wishbones is pretty conventional - balljoint, legs, inner joints.

 

I employed some high accuracy composite material jigs for this stage. The balljoint 'box' is the chunk on the right, obviously. The tongue sticking out simulates the ball-centre of the joint when installed.

5a2bf645485ef_Frontjig.thumb.jpeg.6f8a3cf493a32e4ef73bd0c7757c3ad5.jpeg

 

Next bit...

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Second one finished.

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Upper arms are slightly different. They have a spherical joint at the outer end and the rear facing leg is adjustable. When welding the bearing cup to the front leg I put a brass insert in place to prevent too much weld distortion. It certainly helped, but it wasn't totally successful as I needed to ease most of them.

5a2bf63e9f372_Frontarm.thumb.jpeg.c244978907bd40e103dbb559660140f5.jpeg

All the bungs are plug and seam welded onto the tubes.

5a2bf640252a4_FrontUpperwishboneparts.thumb.jpeg.fc59e1b52a721222744cd810cc5ded4c.jpeg

This was a bit of a milestone really - the first bits bolted together.

5a2bf7ae11e8a_Leftsidefrontwishbones.thumb.jpeg.7474c40b7a45e2136e79c11b7425e75a.jpeg

5a2bf7b20a4f3_Rightsidewishbones.thumb.jpeg.04c144d4a272752eb10059c4a4b2f215.jpeg

 

 

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