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nice_guy

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About nice_guy

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    Pedestrian

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    90 SEi

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  1. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    There is no such thing as overkill. (and it's merely a stupidly overcomplicated way in attempting to keep the classic aspect of the dashboard, with 4 gauges max, and have a lot of info on display) Making a bit of progress, still not chewing too much program memory (51% at the time being)... Working a bit on the faceplate... Need to find waterproof paper (polyester thingy) (this is test data, I don't expect to see such a pressure in the real world...) Getting there regarding enclosure shape and tabs and ridges and locating stuff to hold the display as flush as possible in its window... been designing with no clearance (bad) and it sort of works nicely (good). And only iterated 4 times on printing/design for the most redone bit. I need to print a full body in white plastic to see how the backlight will illuminate the thing, 2D print the face and calibrate the needle sweep. I considered adding a led or RGB led, but at least at home flashing the whole screen seems noticeable enough... I'm still waiting forth components and parts : GPS module (hopefully soon) and rotary encoder/switch. And there's the slight issue of the car around it, too.
  2. There is at least one : http://tmmf.toyota-europe.com/
  3. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    (I've just spent the best part of two hours trying to find a suitable, good looking font for the 128x32 pixels display) //---- Arduino time ----
  4. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    I guess I'm not the only one suffering of the Binky Syndrome. Overengineering something very close to a part you could just have bought. Well... (work in progress) Turns out the smiths gauges are quite expensive in the end (and I might face unavailability in the future). Plus they are 10 volts and need calibration. But they look so goooooood. Someone linked an ebay oil pressure sensor, a 3 wire job running on 5 volts that was well mannered enough to give out nominal pressure with a linear 0.5v to 4.5v. Solves calibration. Add a servo, and an arduino for calibration. Print a few bits and bobs (4 parts including the hand), buy a replacement bezel, a 50 mm watch crystal, leave a window in the gauge face for, let's say a .91 inch oled display, and I might have a gauge that will display reliable oil pressure and some other things. Like GPS speed. Or fuel consumption. In the end the outer body will be printed using white material (for ligh spreading), probably ABS (I hear it's hot under the scuttle). And the rough "out of the printer" surface will be either painted matte black or covered with a printout of suitable gauge face depending on the part. (And once completed and perfectly working on the bench it will be a useless mess in the car because of voltage spikes or electric noise, obviously)
  5. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    I've spent the day vaguely dreaming of a lapping setup allowing me to sand 4 degrees out of the head facing plane (removing 3mm from the lower side and leaving the other "edge" untouched). I'd prefer doing it (or having it machined) on a spare item, but I can't find anything else than the mangoletsi manifold on the market... (and I'm still enjoying it)
  6. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    Well, given I can / have to offset the engine by 19 millimeters (I'm chasing pixels at the time being, this sounds like a lot) I might be able to be more sideways next time I wrestle that iron greasy thing. Shift it more to the left, tilt it more to the right. i'll get the measurements (the 120mm between bottom of chassis rail and crankshaft axis needs to be checked on the car) I'm still not entirely trusting the manifold, I've measured the angle it gives the carbs (thanks to the picture) at 5°. The mangoletsi is stated to tilt by 2.5° (but is 20 mmm longer and 5mm higher)
  7. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    (Even if main mission objective, hiding the dcoes, is yet to be completed, the engine positions I've tried along the way are WAYYYYYY better than how it came to me. Things like oil filter or steering column are not so cramped, the thermostat cap wades in a roomy place, and the air filter housing have been lowered significantly)
  8. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    Here are the pictures : This comes from a positionning test, tilting the engine to lower these cumbersome carburettors : (Picture was taken as dead flat as slippery smarthphe and greasy fingers allowed) The rocker cover is lower than the carbs. I assumed that was "the way", but given that I've so far failed to fit the thing without interference or a weber poking out, well, now I'm maybe open to a bit of doubt regarding the manifold. If this looks weird to anyone.... The said manifold bears no visible marking. Looks lie this from top : The manifold is short (60 ish millimeters) and elevates the port by about 30 millimeters.... But even if I find something lower, the distributor is lurking just under...
  9. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    Well, I do not have this drawing, would you mind telling me the page number for this ? (And maybe the cover).
  10. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    Oooh, I like your drawing way better ! (Pictures will come a bit later)
  11. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    Nature graced me with an apetite for tricky situations. My car is not that close to factory fit, it's an early sei, and was probably born with another engine and a 4 speed gearbox. The car is / was configured in a way to maximize ground clearance, with bespoke engine mounts. Or maybe it was an afterthought after fitting a bit of steel to mount the gearbox, who knows? Maybe this intake manifold is not the most apt at getting the dcoes under the bonnet. Oh, it was the first thing I had a look on once getting to this business... ... but the manual says engine (kent) should be central in the engine bay. Maybe my powertrain is a smidge rearwards, but I'm not that far from the 12.7 mm between bellhousing and the footwell end plane. Gorgeous. And revvy.
  12. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    More pics : Position 1, no compromise : Nearly inline with my initial plan, engine vaguely where I wanted it, propshaft fouls the top tunnel transversal bracing and clutch arm hits the chassis diagonal. Mission sink the carb, done : Thermostat cap on top of engine has loooooaaaads of headroom, but engine angled slightly nose down, hence propshaft hits the ceiling and clutch arm hits severely the diagonal tube. Position two : close but no cigar Went to the other way, positionning the engine in the best compromise so the clutch arm has 1mm before hitting the diagonal bar, making sure the cv joint on the propshaft stays clear Roomy thermostat cap (was rubbing the nose cone if so slightly before): CV joint happily rotating, clutch arm a hair of touching the diagonal bar, but... Damn, it sticks out. Need it 10mm down at least. The carbs are far from the crankshaft axis, more than the end of the clutch arm, I may get away with it by tilting a whisker the engine to the right (lowering the carbs and the cluch arm) and rising the whole engine to give clutch arm clearance back. (I used a spirit level on rocker cover to sort of ensure engine was in a vertical plane). I've wiggled the engine in many a position, but all of them are compatible with the exhaust manifold I have. Not shifting engine position by great increments. "Backed in a corner" options I don't think I'll notch the bit of transversal tubing securing the gearbox mount to lower the gearbox (rectangular tubing, probably no more than 2mm thick at best) so it'll probably stay that way, given @neptune's plate is 5mm thick. I may have a danst custom manifold made, or find a suitable low profile manifold and either sand the engine facing plane (oh, the pain) or have it machined to change the angle the carbs are pointing (upwards on all manifolds I've found) to flat or worse. The clutch arm is the most annoying one. I may notch the diagonal tube (and the notching and appropriate reinforcment can be done with the engine in the car) but I have not seen it done, and it works on @Peter Robinson s car (see this thread) I can have the gearbox mount offset to the left side, and offset the engine in the compartment. How much would highline bonnet and nosecone would cost ? (that would be capitulating. And way too easy) Currently googling intake manifolds...
  13. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    That's absolutely the case. It fits with my knowledge of the past of this car and what can be seen under the tunnel. I do not aim to get a "factory fit" configuration, rather something that works without hitting anything, being carbs in the bonnet, clutch arm or propshaft joint... Clearances are tight. Would have done the same. Or something giving the same locations as factory fit, regardless of the actual making. Here's the picture : The previous mount location can be seen, as well as the molten alloy panel when the brace was welded post-panelling. The bolts are not on this picture, and the gearbox mount is standing 4mm to the left regarding the position secured with the bolts. Doesn't change overall wiggling envelope as much as I would have hoped...
  14. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    Thanks a lot @neptune (See: Wanted a deity, another steps in. Lovin' it !) This helps a lot, though my chassis is from pre-internet era (1988). An idea of the thickness of that plate ? I'll take pictures in a couple of minute, for fun.
  15. nice_guy

    A respectable Granny

    It's getting more and more interesting. Currently the engine is resting on a forest of jacks, bits of wood and a prayer too, vaguely in the desired position. Went under the thing (oily, that powertrain. Must have two stroke lineage), to have a better look at the gearbox mounts. They are very slightly off, I'l leave no stone unturned and I'll probably relocate them. But that's not the fun part, oh noooo. The gearbox is resting on a specific (i.e. custom, if it makes sense in a kit car) member welded to the chassis after panneling. and it's slightly beefier than the chassis square tubes. It stands a bit proud of the lower chassis tubing top plane. Let's say 2 to 4 mm. The T9 gearbox mount stands on top of it. This mount : I'm not sure the "original" gearbox mount location on the chassis is this thick. Pictures I've found show a somehow thick plate, but chassis construction may vary. The consequence of a high gearbox mount is, obviously, as I lower the engine, it makes the output shaft point a bit upwards. A tiny bit. Enough for the propshaft CV joint to foul the tunnel top bracing it sits under. Is the "original" t9 mount on the chassis a bit of flat steel, or a bit of steel profile ? Current ordered options (I'll give it a bit of brain time) are : Find the sweet spot between engine height at carb level, gearbox cv joint, cluch arm and boss) Notch / delete the top tunnel bracing (might be needed if I extend gearbox lever mechanism anyway) Find a lower profile gearbox mount (engine out job probably, I don't think the gearbox bolt is reachable in situ) Notch the gearbox mount chassis member (tight in there, engine out job, need a workshop crane) Start crying quietly, curl in a ball and hope for divine intervention (Crom is the relevant deity, as we're talking steel) Good thing is, I had the opportunity to dremel off the 5/16 UNC bolts that hold the gearbox ruber mount. There be Metric. With long nuts that can be reached from under the car) The worst part of it is that I'm really enjoying this.
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