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Windy's new project


windy
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Been doing a bit of work in the garage.

Got given a wreck with a number plate that's worth something.

2006_0622dadphotos0012a.jpg

Appears a bit rusty on the floors but actually quite good for a 27 year old car

2006_0622dadphotos0013.jpg

Outside had some horrible fibre glass arches which were promptly removed and sold on ebay

2006_0622dadphotos0014.jpg

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Graham,

Quit whilst you are ahead!

John  :0

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I wondered where the steering wheel off my 205 had gone.

You do know it has to have an MoT for you to transfer the plate...

Do you want the wheel? I still have it if you want to save it from going in the skip ???  :)

Reg is staying with the car.

Anyway here's some progress:

Shell stripped & on a spit.

shell1.jpg

Found some rot in the drivers side A pillar & floor so new panels welded in.

shell2.jpg

A repair section for the rotten C pillar was removed from another shell and grafted in.

shell3.jpg

New sill put on drivers side.

shell4.jpg

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Thorough job as usual Windy - I admire your patience.

I see you have plug wleded along the bottom of the sill - do MoT examiners accept that? If so you've just saved me a lot of hassle.

Chris

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Thorough job as usual Windy - I admire your patience.

I see you have plug wleded along the bottom of the sill - do MoT examiners accept that? If so you've just saved me a lot of hassle.

Chris

As long as the plug welds replicate the original spot weld positions you are OK. Also remember that you must remove the old panel first - some people just slap another one on top which often gets the MOT man twitchy - I think if they see a bodge that's when they usually say that the repair must have a "continuous weld".

Shell is just being repaired at the moment. Once the rally bits go in it'll all be seam welded.

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I always think a mig-plug is stronger than a spot weld , some spot welds just ping off when you prize them apart   :0  If you"ve  tried to take of a panel that has bin migplugged on you will agree  :D  :D  :sheep:

windy..  agree that looks a thorough job.. are you  trained doing this sort of thing or taught in the school of life   :t-up:

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Look a fairly tidy shell.  Bit Envious I still like old escorts. Years ago I did a Mk1 RS2000, just as panels were starting to run out, but managed to get ford front wings and a front panel (wings were £30ea  I recall...)  Worst part was the inner wings which required a lot of patching (strut tops, drip rails, suspension cups, and thel ower bit where it is welded to the for and aft box section. Took me nearly 3 yrs.

Interesting bit of the rear wing you've replaced -accident damaged I guess, funny place to rust!

I wrote mine up for Practical classics and  got £100 with a signed letter from Ms Butler-Henderson (? -the mad woman now on 5th gear you guys all lust over, used to work for Pratcial Classics !).

Tell us more - wot motor you gonna use ? what trim ? what are you going to do with it ( Rally ?)

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As long as the plug welds replicate the original spot weld positions you are OK. Also remember that you must remove the old panel first - some people just slap another one on top which often gets the MOT man twitchy - I think if they see a bodge that's when they usually say that the repair must have a "continuous weld".

:t-up:  :t-up:  :t-up: Top Job :t-up:  :t-up:  :t-up:

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Look a fairly tidy shell.  Bit Envious I still like old escorts. Years ago I did a Mk1 RS2000, just as panels were starting to run out, but managed to get ford front wings and a front panel (wings were £30ea  I recall...)  Worst part was the inner wings which required a lot of patching (strut tops, drip rails, suspension cups, and thel ower bit where it is welded to the for and aft box section. Took me nearly 3 yrs.

Interesting bit of the rear wing you've replaced -accident damaged I guess, funny place to rust!

I wrote mine up for Practical classics and  got £100 with a signed letter from Ms Butler-Henderson (? -the mad woman now on 5th gear you guys all lust over, used to work for Pratcial Classics !).

Tell us more - wot motor you gonna use ? what trim ? what are you going to do with it ( Rally ?)

You can still get nearly all the panels. There's a company called Ex pressed panels that does nearly everything but fairly costly. If you want any bits genuine Ford you have to cut the good bits off scrap cars. Ex-pressed stuff is extremely close to the quality of the genuine Ford panels. Pattern wings from Hadrian are still only £40, the whole front end + 2 door skins was only £250 delivered. I guess providing there is enough demand for these bits, the suppliers will continue to make them.

Rear quarter wasn't accident damaged but i think the rot had set in in the C pillar, then someone bodged it with filler to hide it. I think the water then sat inside because it could no longer drain out.

Its going to get a big power engine, either proper works spec 1800 BDA of Millington / Cossie YB depending on what will be most saleable. Haven't decided yet. Shell will be prepped to Group 4 spec or better. Getting ideas from Colin McRaes car is making me want to make it something special. :D

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