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The stuff they run Jumbo's on?

I may be talking out of my :arse: but I think it is more like parrafin than petrol. Even if it was high octane, it wouldnt make that much differance performance wise unless the engine needs high octane fuel in the first place.

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Kerosene is closer to diesel than petrol I believe ??? I know of some people in the states who have been experimenting with running on it in diesel engine  :0  :arse:  :xmas:

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Wrox continues his quest for "free" horsepower..............

He'll learn.................

Maybe :p

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errrrrrrrrrrm be real man  :p how dare  you think of

running  lil bandit on airline fuel  :arse: try cellulose thinners or brake cleaner  ;) think of da car man  :( think of da car

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get wid it man lay of the ganja it aint doin ya no good  ;) didn't do bob marley any good either  :arse:  ;)

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if you really want extra bang for your buck there's only one way NOS better than any 100 octane petrolium you stick in light aircraft,westy and NOS there's a thought :0

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AVTUR - Jet engine fuel, is just Kerosine

AVGAS (Most commonly 100LL) is leaded petrol (with a few additives) which at 100 Octane is about half way between 4 star and the old 5 star. You will find that some flying clubs use it in their airfield vehicles but not on the public roads, HM Customs take a dim view because duty is paid at a different rate and that's one of the reasons that 100LL is dyed blue (also helps re-fuellers distinguish it from AVTUR). Don't think that because it's an aeroplane that the fuel or engines are something special. It's only recently that light piston aero-engines have started to catch up with auto engines in terms of technology. There are some great engines made nowadays by people like ROTAX, Jabiru etc. the future for light avaiation looks like it's going to be deisel engines, but at the moment most light aircrat are fitted with heavy lumps made by Lycoming or Continental. Reliability and huge tolerances are what they are all about not necessarily efficiency and they haven't really changed in design since the 1950s.  

The problem with this is that aero-engines have to operate over a very wide range of ambient air tempatures and air densities. When designing engines manufacturers use a standard set of coditions known as ISA (International Standard Atmosphere) as the basis for their designs. This gives a sea-level air temperature of 15C and states the assumed rate of temp loss and density with height. In practice even in the UK you could start your engine in an air temp of  over 25C and 25 minutes later be at 10,000ft where the outside air temp will be below 0C and half the air density you had at ground level. On most of the carbed engines there is mixture control in the cockpit so that the pilot can lean the mixture as he climbs (air-density drops with height and therefore the mixture would naturally become over-rich). The fuel that they run on has a higher octane rating to cope with the range of operating conditions, but as refineries stopped producing leaded fuel for cars the cost of producing relatively small quantities of leaded AVGAS has increased. AVGAS has become very expensive, and a lot of light aviation has changed over to running on LRP. But using this on aero engines is at the expense of operating limitations, for example you shouldn't use LRP above 6,000ft and you can have cylinder-head problems if your engine is constantly run at high power.

At ground level my Zetec engine has probably got about twice the power to weight ratio of any Lycoming.

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