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Westfield loom or go DIY?


DIY-Si

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Simon,

 

I'm glad you've mentioned the trailer connectors, as they're what I was considering for the front and rear connections. I am considering running a pair of front driving lights, as I too intend using my car at night, so having the option to add extra lighting circuits will be important for me. Likewise for a high level brake on the roll bar, but that might not need much extra wiring.

 

I also like what you've said about the need for it to not look bodged. I intend taking a lot of care to ensure its all properly wrapped, maybe even with heat shrink to help with longevity. The proper tools will help massively with this i think.

 

Do you have any suggestions for a decent quality crimping tool? I've asked Santa for a new heat gun, but a new tool for the crimps could be snuck in too as mine is old. 

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Simon Marks - North Oxfordshire AO

Hi, Si,

 

For non insulated connectors (my favourites with nylon covers) I have Car Builder Solutions'  "Proper "F-Crimp" Crimping Tool

https://www.carbuilder.com/uk/proper-f-crimp-crimping-tool

 

On the odd occasion I use a pre-insulated connector (none on my Westfield), I also have a ratchet crimp tool - like: https://www.carbuilder.com/uk/ratchet-crimp-tool-2

In all honesty, if I use these connectors as earth rings (I have boxes of free ones from a job we did at work), I would normally take off the hard plastic sleeve, crimp using water pump pliers, add a drop of solder and cover with heat shrink sleeving - much less clumsy!

 

I have been a huge fan of heat shrink for many years now.  I buy rolls of it from our local "old school" hardware shop which makes it much more affordable than convenience packs of shorter lengths.  When pushing cables through the sleeving, I use a squirt of silicone lubricant spray which helps them slide through without snagging.

 

I would also run separate earths from the driving lights back to ground on the chassis.  An extra 110W (I assume you will use high quality / output bulbs) in the headlamps / drive lamps) could well overwhelm the existing wires.   I use PIAA Night Tech bulbs in all my cars and find them excellent for performance and durability).  Some historic racing Lotus Elevens (and other cars of the period) have extra lighting in the lower front bodywork that look really trick - but you'll need some Perspex bending skills to shroud them!

 

Simon

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Simon,

 

The front lights, if not all the lights, will likely have separate earth runs back to the chassis as I have spent too long tracing dodgy earths on my old minis to want to play those games again. I also intend to cheat slightly, as any vehicle registered before Oct '83 doesn't have to stick to the 50/55W bulbs, so I could use 100W bulbs for each driving light once passed the IVA. Heck, I could use them for all 4 of the front lights as I have on a mini in the past. They're amazing at night, but switching them off can be like walking into a dark room when going from the full 550W I had to the more normal 110W on dipped beam. Anything that powerful would also be run from relays, as doing it any other way puts too much load through the switches.

 

Thanks for the silicone spray tip, I very much think I'll be using that!

 

The lower bodywork lights as per the Lotus Eleven are exactly what I have in mind, if I can sort the covers. The below is the kind of look I'd like, if I can make it practical for touring.

image.jpeg-1.jpg

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Simon Marks - North Oxfordshire AO

They are great looking additions!

 

You have obviously been through the same apprenticeship as me with old cars and 100W bulbs - in my case, road and stage rallying a BMW 2002 Tii.  A couple of wet rallies, with wipers on full speed, as well as heated rear window on, saw the lights slowly dimming so that was the point at which I went back to 55W bulbs with extra attention paid to the earths.

 

Over recent years the better bulbs have the equivalent of 100W output from 55W drain so I have them in all my cars - including the Westfield.  With good old fashioned 7" round headlights,the PIAA Night Tech bulbs are like the 100W bulbs of old,with the advantage of an equivalent upgrade in the dip beam output as well.  The reflector / lenses of the Westfield supplied headlights has been good enough to give an accurate dipped beam pattern so I have not been offending people while night driving.

 

This summer, I have put Hella 500 driving lights on both my VW Passat B6 and Skoda Octavia VRS Mk1 daily runarounds.  The Octavia was previously hampered by a poor main beam from its H4 headlamps.  The Hellas have totally resolved this.  The addition of driving lights to the Passat's 4 bulb main beams has made the lights absolutely brilliant - and, in reality, better than the lights I used to rally behind.  In years gone by, I had put (cheap) driving lights on an Astra MK3 company car I had and they made a similarly marked improvement. The Hella 500 lights are a reasonably inoffensive size but are good quality lights so are a great upgrade.

 

I have seen rally cars go through High Intensity Discharge and now LED lighting but can't justify the spending on such things and, as you say, the contrast between full lighting and dipped beams is far too large for road usage.  Aren't modern car LED lights annoying? - particularly when on a large 4x4 following you closely!  I also find the current LED light bars to be so ugly when bolted across the front of cars that I wouldn't want to deface any of my vehicles.

 

Simon

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paul kynaston
15 hours ago, Simon Marks - North Oxfordshire AO said:

 When pushing cables through the sleeving, I use a squirt of silicone lubricant spray which helps them slide through without snagging.

 

 

Instead of using silicone try using Hellerine oil, does the same job but has the advantage of drying out so the loom does not stay oily and is vegetable based and cleans off easier.  

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jonjh1964

I did the same as Simon for the same reasons, new Westfield loom and modified it for the changes I wanted/needed.  Westfield provide an instruction sheet to delete the dynamo/separate voltage regulator fit an alternator and a CTEK circuit to meet the IVA fog light switching requirements.  Post IVA I've moved the reverse and fog lights to back of the chassis which means I didn't need to add an extra connector between the chassis and rear clam looms.

If your using a hi torque starter motor (WOSP/Brise etc) you can do away with the separate starter solenoid and reduce the amount of heavy gauge wiring.

 

Overall it's a simple loom and looks quite tidy when installed, econoseal by the radiator connects to the front clam loom for lights/indicators.

IMG_0193.thumb.jpg.91fb2778804d4b893983105b63e9b774.jpg

 

Extra switched 12V for the MegaJolt ECU and fuses mounted on a bracket under one of the scuttle covers for easy access

IMG_0169.thumb.jpg.7a4ec425cd9d96fdf25b63cd52a85e54.jpg

Back of the chassis loom plus the battery, speedo sensor and fog/reverse lights (post IVA), econoseal connectors only have the side/brake/indicator light wiring.

IMG_0297.thumb.jpg.6a62c322ddf7716a999375bef9f5e11c.jpg

 

 

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