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AlexSB

Best battery for Crossflow

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AlexSB

Hi all - quick question.

 

1600 Crossflow - pretty much standard - 80-100hp.

 

I'm having trouble starting and it's cranking really slowly, I suspect the battery may not be helping matters. Even in the past, when the battery has been fully charged and everything has been otherwise fine, it struggles to hold enough charge to get things going.

 

I've attached photos of what I have now - it's a PowerVamp 25 racing battery. I believe, these racing batteries are lighter, but have a lower voltage than standard batteries.

 

I've no interntion of taking it racing and the performance gains of the lighter battery aren't really a concern.

 

If I want to replace it with something a little more 'traditional', what should I go for? 

 

Thanks in advance!

 

 

DSC_2203.JPG

DSC_2204.JPG

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AlexSB

p.s. Sorry - I think this should have gone into the 'FAQ' folder, not The Start Line. If there are any Mods around, I'm happy for it to move.

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corsechris

Apart from a brief interval when we ran an Odyssey gel cel, I’ve always gone with the largest size cheapo from Halfords that will fit the battery holder. IIRC, they are usually around the 40Ah capacity range and have usually worked well enough. The Odyssey was 14Ah I think and if it didn't start pretty much straight off, that was it. Poor starting performance can be down to many factors, not just the battery, so you may need to do some methodical testing. One big improvement to Xflow starting performance was fitting 3D ignition. Allowed me to set cranking advance to 5 degrees rather than the 13 it was set to with the clockwork dizzy. Helped a lot, particularly with a hot engine as it was fairly high CR so tended to kick back a lot against compression. 

 

I still have the Odyssey battery many years later, it gets used as an emergency jump battery from time to time for other cars and for testing assorted components like starters etc etc.

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Peter Robinson

I have a powervamp racing 25 and it's has to be left on trickle charge or it dies, very slow cranking. I am going again for a small form factor battery and it looks neat under the bonnet. I was looking at a cheap one to last just a couple of years and replace again like this one -

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-22AH-MOTORSPORT-LIGHTWEIGHT-6KG-RALLY-COMPETITION-RACING-CAR-BATTERY/111177129078?epid=16027205889&hash=item19e2ac5c76:g:m-EAAOxySy9SRC4T

 

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Lyonspride

When my gel battery gave up many years ago, I went to Westfield and got a 015 type battery with battery tray from them, since then i've changed the battery twice. The 015 type is old school, its cheap and you can unscrew the vents to check the levels and condition of the plates. It however slightly heavy and a very tight fit under the bonnet, with probably less than 10mm to spare.

The real problem with the crossflow is the static advance, unless you have a mapped electronic ignition which can set the advance to zero, you'll always struggle to start it as the engine fights against the starter motor.

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Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary

Exactly as Lyonspride said above. The real culprit is probably the  ignition advance when your trying to start. Effective.y the engine is fighting against the starter, trying to stop itself spinning. This puts much more load on the battery etc, a "bigger" battery may help for a while, (indeed, may even be vital if the old battery is now slightly knackered), but in the end is just a sticking plaster on the symptoms.

 

There are usually two main things causing slow turnover and poor starting on old school stuff like crossflows. The most common is the ignition advance. As was mentioned earlier, going for "3D" ignition control, in other words, electronic ignition that has both a crank speed sensor and a throttle position sensor, can make a massive difference, helps with drivability, somewhat, too.

The other issue that comes into play on more tuned engines, is the extra compression in the cylinders, the starter is literally having to do more work as it spins. A high torque starter can help significantly with this one.

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Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary

PS, have moved this to Tech Talk, where mechanical type questions can get a better response.

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AlexSB

Thanks all - after a bit of shopping around, I've gone for a big 680 cca unit from Halfords, which has done the trick in getting it up and running again. 

 

It's pretty huge, so might not be a long term solution and, as Dave said, it may be a sticking plaster if something else is going on. 

 

Next step is a compression test and, possibly, tuning the carb. Both of which I'll have plenty of newbie questions about. 

 

Cheers! 

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