Jump to content
nice_guy

A respectable Granny

Recommended Posts

nice_guy

Added a forgotten dash light (headlights... tsssk tsssk..).

 

Wired the "ign" light in the speedometer, had to rethingy the bulb holder that had  a dodgy riveted connection. Managed to solder the joint without melting the plastic, I don't know if one can easily source 40 years old smiths bulb holders.

 

Wired the oil pressure switch on the driver side (I still value oil pressure data above everything), between the two main clocks, on top of the (green ?) light within the speedo.

 

And I spent an AMAZING amount of time depinning the hazard switch connector, and soldering to the sub part of the harness with a relay that will perform the same pole swapping as the switch.

So turn this :

image.png.8721a1ad93f83e87ac0df09d90986bd9.png

 

Into this :

image.png.35a272682ffdff36b8d2f83f4e87aa1a.png

 

3D printed holder/ connection protector with ears so that it can be ziptied to the harness, color coding as good as I could, heatshrink everywhere. Soldering in a cramped place, rigid wire on a too short length. Soldered everything, splices and heatshrink and all, before a final test. Burnt fingers, too.

I actually soldered the wires on the relay, 1/4" spaces and no block connector available for the puny 11 pin relay.

 

Haven't terminated the hazard light and the actual lucas togglee switch, but it worked. Click Click. That feeling, when it works after a succession of steps without testing... Hope the small relay, rated for 5 amps, will bear the load.

 

(One might ask, why not an electronic contraption like a freewheel of sorts ? Well, it's a bit like a mechanical watch, I like the analogue spirit.)

 

The windscreen washer switch has been replaced by a smaller, lower amp capacity switch that will look a bit like the dash lights. This switch comes out from the driver side of the dash, so needed a small connector that could fit through the 12mm hole, and a small relay was added.

 

(Like the wipers, I sometimes wonder why I spend so much time for such an apalling result)

 

Next job is the connectors for the gauges (speedo, tacho and the herd of 52mm), plus the 10v converter, then I'll get back to metal shavings. At last.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

I had a miserable failure with econoseal connector, thought it would be less bulky than an inline 6 superseal. Well, it is, but was a pain to unpin, so much that the cable came out, without the pin.

 

I put everything on the wooden template, to gauge (haha) the amount of rewiring I'll have to do to make it look neat.

 

image.png.367e7f6b0633a0ce94735b0b9fffeafd.png

 

Well, a lot.

 

(not a surprise, the loom is designed with branches for gauges located in a place, and OBVIOUSLY I want it otherwise.)

Factor in multiple relays, submodules and as many sensors as I could cram in...

(but everything stupidely overcomplicated like the electronic toggle high beam, or the single switch hazard works, I swear)

 

So next stage is add the 4 52mm gauges, and tidy....

  • Glue little plastic tabs to the spades-connected switches that will allow to zip tie the wires securely to the switch
  • Shorten everything I added to correct suitable length
  • Attach the relay holders the best way
  • Zip ties
  • Black tape

I'll be happy to switch to non copper metal work... someday.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

Hopefully it'll end, from the drivers view, as a poor attempt to look half as good as @garytipping fabulous prelit

 

image.png.3ba69499502f0ec828e448ea917392b0.png

 

Or a car famous for its electrical sturdyness

image.png.fcd1c673f19941d17425fd45137f5b2e.png

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
garytipping

I'm sure it will be just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

Getting closer, wiring is pretty ok (well, everything seems to be working fine so far, meaning there is something that will fry the whole harness lurking in a corner...)

 

Superseal are nice but a tad bulky for underdash, but it should be okayish. I used coloured tie wraps to figure harness branches (black tape will do a better, smoother job). So it's a huge mess of wires with yellow binds all over the place, looks like a spicy noodle dish.

 

I'll post pics whel I'll be able to bear the shame of a handful of relays dangling from the loom.

 

< Warning : Nerduino stuff below >

 

I, however, encountered a slight issue. My upside down fuel gauge has a piggyback arduino, that reads fuel sender resistance (thanks to a voltage divider).

Arduino should be able to supply 200mah on vcc pin (let's call it the main positive). So after multimetering the sender resistance (120 ish ohms with whatever is in the tank), I assumed it should be a 240-33 ohm contraption.

So I decided to get a 200 ohm resistor (to vcc) in my divider, to have a 50/50 ratio and get most of the analogic to digital resolution. Cheeky but within board specs.

It worked, then stopped working. Restistance (is futile) is measurable unplugged, but vanishes once powered.

I hope only the resistor fried, because it worked for a reasonable while (I had readings on the computer, felt like a master ecu tuner).

mmmh, might solder something more robust. Analog reading resolution is 1024, split in half is about 500, I may get a 1kohms, I'll still get 160 steps of resolution, and 5 times less current through the poor passive component. I don't like the idea, though the obvious rationale is that accuracy on the gauge and the sender is wayyyyyyyy off the internal maths. But still.

 

Why, one might ask, did the hell you put an arduino on a fuel gauge ?

Well, I wanted to have a way to map "whatever sender does" to gauge reading, so I have maps. The gauge is not that linear in pwm response (and pwm is fed through a transistor/10v source and much more oomph that what the little pro micro is able to provide). The gauge itself is electromechanically damped (i.e : slow), but I added digital smoothing. Call it an numeric anti sloshing  baffle ? It was an easy way to work around expensive and cumbersome jobs or replacing sender to have a classic smiths dial. I may add a low fuel warning led somewhere, maybe a neopixel on the gauge lighting itself : they are stupidly bright, t'might work.

 

This was my latest episode in "how to devise the most complicated nearly-a-solution to a trivial problem"

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
corsechris

Rearrange these words into a well known saying or phrase:

 

Punishment. For. Glutton.

 

:)

 

The only justification you need for all this is simply ‘because’.  Crack on!!

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy
3 hours ago, corsechris said:

Rearrange these words into a well known saying or phrase:

 

Punishment. For. Glutton.

 

 

 

Honestly it's a very good way of roaming through life with maximum enjoyment. Or survive raising kids.

 

 

 

3 hours ago, corsechris said:

The only justification you need for all this is simply ‘because’.  Crack on!!

 

So true. Well, it's been scrolling numbers consistently on my terminal, It read 99 with a 100 ohm resistors stuck in the connector, so I assume the 1kohm in the divider will end up in the car. Acceptable error given the inaccuracies in and out of the system.

 

The little protoboard connected to the arduino  has been given a piezo tweeter that beeps angrily when fuel is low, I probably will never hear it until the engine dies out of fuel starvation... need to figure out how to have a visual thingy, but dash is complete, anything would hurt the delicate visual balance of a toggle switch row...

 

I'll try the neopixel backlight...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

Received the quick release with escort splines (matching my column).

Had to powerfile a socket to get the nut done, but it sorts of fits. It's a wee bit red, I'll correct this with paint and chemistry.

It means I could have my rf transmitted miunted in the boss, and all that heavy metal around doesn't prevent it from working.

Good.

Printed a .. thingy to secure the rf transmitter circuit board in the boss, ditched the soft contact switch and wired it to the horn switch, and, guess what, it still works.

I have the only removable wheel that still honks while removed from the car.

 

I used black tape on some branches of the wiring, starting to look better by small increments. Also started the aluminium dash. With a bit of additional templates.

For several reasons. Given I have the pedals rougly right, proper bench seats and A STEERING WHEEL IN PLACE, I can have a better line of sight. Hence speedo and tacho were mostly hidden by the slim and delicate motolita wooden rim. So I brought them closer and lower. The turn signal and oil pressure lights between clocks are relocated accordingly.

 

Driving position wise it's not too bad, I wish the steering was a bit closer to the dash (the steering wheel I have is the non dished one) but even with a soldered on quick relase type steering wheel it would be the case, the setup I have is actually quite compact length wise.

 

image.png.84146597560a11a338ccc4b0c1c118b7.png

 

It's just starting to look like a respectable granny.

(The template is not too big, the lenght hanging low will be used for a folded return.

 

Unfortunately, setbacks are lurking.

The aviation floating nut plates, beautiful things these, that are riveted in the scuttle. They are beautiful. They are expensive. They are perfectly mounted, with countersunk rivets.

They are imperial threaded.

 

 

 

So either I'll make little aluminium plates with rivnuts (and start using that little cnc to cut them) or I'll source m4 nut plates

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
corsechris

Demon Tweeks do M4 nut plates. Well, they used to anyway. Not bought any recently. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

I've actually ordered the rattly "floating" nutplates, with built in play to cope with les than ideally positionned holes. For one supid metallic reason : the beautiful slotted screws I've bought for the dash are stainless. Doesn't sound like a good idea in aly rivnuts. Better stick with steel.

 

You wouldn't believe how easy it is to route a somehow stiff aluminium sheet with woodworking router and cutting bit. Went in 2mm 5754 sheet like a hot knife through ... something really soft. And the aly is pretty tough, I stalled the drill past 16mm on the stepped drill bit (you need a hole for the router bit, my $4 routing bits do not have cutting surfaces on their ends)

 

So I began building the aly dash, with several templates (one for the relocated speedo & tacho gang, so that a can peer at more than 12% of their respective surfaces with the wheel on, and one for the general outer shape and the 50mm gauges, bulby lights and clicky switches...)

 

I build jigs, locating holes, datums, measured seven times, everything is perfect regarding templates and jigs, and that can only mean something awfully wrong will happen when offering to the car.

 

On the plus side, the router leaves a very nice edge finish, if a little cutting burr (like a giant cabinet scraper if that makes sense).

On the minus side, it spits little swarfy squares, maybe 2x2mm, at an alarming rate, and if eye protection is no question, well, I should have put a pair of wellies on. Socks filled with little chips.

 

As I've relocated the big clocks closer to the steering shaft cutout, well, there is a bit of a weak spot in this area. I'll probably use the offcuts from the dash to build reinforcing plates, and I'll glue them on the backside with a lot of love and two part hobby epoxy.

 

Then I'll have a whiff of black rattle can paint on the red parts of the quick release that have no mating surfaces, and will strip that crimson anodizing with household chemistry (anything with lye, had great success with drain cleaning stuff) on the outer ring.

 

 Looks like this :

Removable%20Boss%20Ball%20Fix%20(6).JPG

 

Only red was available at http://www.m11rf.com/product_info.php?cPath=22&products_id=68

(If anyone needs an escort mk2 splined quick release steering boss... took me a while to find one)

I removed the slip ring, went RF for the horn.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

A bit of picture always helps.

So once masked, brushed with drain cleaner and CAREFULLY rinsed, here is the steering quick release in al its raw aluminiumness :

 

image.png.8e9054c918ecf7bf3d22be071ac98909.png

 

I used a brush to apply stinky chemicals, in order not to attack threads on the mounting face.

Looks wayyy better, will do the bit mounted on the column with spray paint.

 

Equipped with moto-lita adapter and rf remote holder :

image.png.6b39e762f934f417f506005bc5f9ea8c.png

 

On the same topic of raw aluminium, the return lip on the dash. How does one bend it ?

 

I routed a round on a thick bit of mdf (former workbench top) as a an edge, and tried to bend it on its full length, with a clamp and a plank. No way. So I used a bit of finesse instead.

 

image.png.ed86d9e15b1d2850826bfcb32eb4a258.png

 

Went surprisingly well, though took a looong time beating the lip, ended with very little warping. Well, way less than I expected. I'll probably purchase a panel beating hammer someeday...

 

Not too unhappy with the result :

 

image.png.72ce70af9a958256901eb62760e24f75.png

 

Would have been better with a die, but I've unfortunately lost the keys to the 30 tons hydraulic press shed.

 

The rounded edge is pretty smooth, the retun bears some little dings (see next picture), but it's plenty rigid, hidden and pretty acceptable to me regarding the caveman technology put into getting that return lip. (about half a mil here and there when I checked with a straight edge).

And it's hidden. This 2mm sheet is pretty tough, and I intended to keep it this way, so no annealing.

 

The reinforcing plate (that the eagle eyed will have seen on above picture) has been glued with liberal amount of epoxy glue on scratched surfaces. Don't think it's going anywhere.

 

image.png.de20b43bceee3a8ce4bb1621b676eb49.png

 

A bit of routing will clean the overlap, need to trim the corners for the scuttle tube to clear. I'll drill the holes dor the switches (14 and 12mm) and the lights (half an imperial unit), then spend hours filing the D shaped hole for the ignition switch, then I'll ruin everything with a failed wrinkle paint attempt.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

I'm tempted to write "proper", but not quite...

 

 

image.png.43938a5b3f13b2f859764096503a6934.png

 

"Adequate" will do. Doesn't look too much like a removable wheel, and that's the goal.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

I made a bit of progress on the dash, no pictures alas, but the thing is (temp) secured to the scuttle using proper metric m4 screws in new nut plates. Wooohoooo.

I also on my way to get a grip on the hobbyist tollchain for hobby dirt cheap cnc mill, in order to engrave the logoed plates between the switch nut and the dash. Available on ebay but not cheap and I'd rather have something engraved. And possibly with a logo rather than text. Well, that was an excuse for the cnc mill.

 

I did throw the towel and used fusion on this to generate gcode, for lack of a better way.. yet.

Gcode is riddled with unsupported (by my lil '3018) instructions, like m26 or g71.

 

I used to work on CNC in my youth, but with... industrial tooling, as far as my researches led me there is little to no free tool offering cam features. Fusion is sort of free but I still don't like it, and the commercial software I tested has not been neither good looking nor easy nor capable. I still have to refine my search.

 

Edit : Found a way to generate gcode accepted by my puny machine (grbl, arduino flavored controller...)

And I also found a way not to run into the blank before the program starts (zero, then lift).

And I also found a way to breal my first tool (ritual of passage...).  Obviously the first slab of moist mdf has been slapped on the machine. Obviously is not a milled sacrifial board. Obviously 400 mmm/minute was a bit cheeky. And the cheap v cutters that came with the machine are probably machined from suzuki bolts... But a failed engraving is an engraving still. Next time, a bit of thick, dry mdf, that'll be milled flat by the machine itself.

If I feel lucky I'll get directly to abs milling....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

While taming the cheap cnc mill, I also printed stuff.

Slow prints with filaflex (very soft rubbery material.

I've printed the O rings (well, they have a square section) that sit between the gauge and the dash, preventing scratching the dash, rotating in the hole or rattling, and generally providing a tidier look to the battered bezels on flat dash.

 

As the bowden setup on the ender 3 is longer than on my ender 2, I've used different settings, and had to crank overextrusion to 130% (because the extruder squashes the filament significantly), and go reaaaaaaalllllllyyyy sloooow.

 

This took nearly two hours to print @100% infill, but hey, it's machine time, that's why they are here for :

 

image.png.1e8ab2fd465a3f163a2204c6c8d21c34.png

 

 

image.png.edb8fbd53bfc8d3d870c57c2cb8280d4.png

 

And same stuff will go around the 52mm gauges.

 

I may have somehow been a tad vocal about 3D printing, but the spool of filaflex has saved me an amazing amount of time hunting rubber gaskets or grommets.

The only add on to a bog standard ender printer is a little clampy thing with a screw, to relieve pressure on the extruder lever (can't find its source anymore). And vuuurrrry slooooow. (like 15mm/s, and knob-set at half speed)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice_guy

Got sidetracked into something settings new standards in utter useless complexity for no good reason at all, and got sidetracked from this into designing and printing a steering column cowling (because the column mounted indicator stalk switch). tricky shape, currently printing.

 

image.png.6f2aa5599a16ffefc5e38c7373d7835f.png

 

(busy view of column, boss bolted on, dash, construction  sections and the two part cowling : one inner that snaps on the steering column, and get secured by the indicator mounting jubilee clip, and the cowling itself secured to inner thingy by two screws on top, and a locating shape.

 

image.png.6b7541083933b3d61504b989ad57d710.png

 

Printed in ABS (because sanding and painting)

 

Shape is tricky, I'm printing it too thin (1.2mm) to have a good surface finish (no continuous external perimeter) but it's going to get sprayed anyway.

 

image.png.4468c8ddec345e94258d311d23a23548.png

Tall, thin shape, wobbly....

 

Should have bought an e-type.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please review our Terms of Use, Guidelines and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.