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You CAN reinvent the wheel…


Chris Broster - Bristol & Bath AO

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Chris Broster - Bristol & Bath AO

Just picked up this article and saw these 3D printed Titanium and Carbon wheels! 

hre3d-unveils-titanium-wheel-3.jpg.7e3ce5a799d44be3e1dc722d34798bdc.jpg

Does this mean that the ongoing quest for lighter un-sprung mass is about to take a leap far into the future?  Maybe so, but not without a significant chunk of your hard earned cash.  I would also have to question the longevity of any such wheels on our less than perfect roads – track warriors only I think.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20181115-hre-ge-additive-unveil-first-3d-printed-titanium-wheel.html?utm_content=79981206&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin

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Not sure I'd want be driving over saw-tooth kerbs on track with those...

Also pretty sure I wouldn't want to be cleaning them, but I suppose if you can afford the wheels, you probably already have a man to do your cleaning for you.....

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Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary

I just worry about some of the “exotic” materials that get used where you wonder if they’re really the best choice! That said, I’m wondering if the sintered titanium doesn’t have the notch sensitivity that a normal TI part can have.

Amazing to see proper structural components now being 3D printed though, I know it’s been going on for a while, but the strength of the finished parts seems to be climbing all the time.

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Chris Broster - Bristol & Bath AO

Agreed @Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary Working in aerospace and defence these are definitely coming to the fore, but they have yet to prove themselves for durability and also lack repairability. 

Furthermore the move away from conventional shapes and structures also presents an issue with fitting all these weird and wonderful bits together? 

But they do have the wow factor and possibly allow for more imagination to become reality? 

 

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TableLeg
On 16/11/2018 at 13:14, CeeBee said:

Just picked up this article and saw these 3D printed Titanium and Carbon wheels! 

hre3d-unveils-titanium-wheel-3.jpg.7e3ce5a799d44be3e1dc722d34798bdc.jpg

Does this mean that the ongoing quest for lighter un-sprung mass is about to take a leap far into the future?  Maybe so, but not without a significant chunk of your hard earned cash.  I would also have to question the longevity of any such wheels on our less than perfect roads – track warriors only I think.

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20181115-hre-ge-additive-unveil-first-3d-printed-titanium-wheel.html?utm_content=79981206&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin

For the extortionately expensive costs I get charged for small ABS/PLA plastic parts I dread to think what these would cost!

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Chris Broster - Bristol & Bath AO

Aye, I think your looking at wearing a Westy a Sport 250 on each corner...before tyres! 

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Man On The Clapham Omnibus

I had a Citroen SM wheel in my lab when I was working on designing mouldings with structural steel 'armatures'. It was made of epoxy resin and a massive loading of quite long glass fibres and steel reinforcements around the mounting holes. MIRA, or perhaps it was TRRL, my memory of the 1970s is vague, sent me a test specification for road wheels and it was pretty onerous - especially where kerbing resistance was concerned. We were thinking about SMC (sheet moulding compound - glass fibre reinforced polyester formed and cured in a press) with steel reinforcements encapsulated inside by our patented process. However the specification was so stiff, and the Citroen wheel so damned heavy presumably to meet the specification, that we (and Citroen I believe) abandoned the whole plastic wheel idea.

I don't know about the notch sensitivity of titanium that Gadgetman mentioned, but sintering always seems to me to be the equivalent of a sand sculpture with regard to strength. In plastics circles rotational moulding with powder feedstock is comparable. 

Just out of interest the pallet below was made by our Japanese licensees using our Encapsulation Process.

bcGxPsq.jpg

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