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stephenh

More XI Questions!

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stephenh

More questions, first regarding wiring of the headlight switches. There is a solid blue wire which I'm sure is the feed from the "master" light switch to the dip switch. From the dip switch that then feeds either a blue with white flash wire, or a blue with red flash wire, according to whether the dip switch is in the full beam position or the dip beam position. MNy question is which is the full beam wire, the blue with white flash or the blue with red flash? 

As yet I haven't got round to working out in what order the wires to the lights master switch should go, that's a pleasure awaiting me!

Second question is totally different and more XI specific. What do people do to secure the front clamshell to it's mounting bar? I can see there is a little bracket with a hole in it welded to the chassis, each side close to the bonnet mountings, but I just can't picture how best to make use of the holes.

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Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary

From memory, main - blue and white, dip - blue and red

Yup, just double checked a manual, feed to main beam change over switch from side lamp/headlamp switch is blue, main - blue/white, dipped blue/red.

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stephenh

Thanks Dave, just what I needed.

Now then, how to secure the front clamshell, without it blowing away in the wind? Or as Donovan used to say: "the answer my friend is blowing in the wind, the answer is blowing in the wind.":):)

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Dave Eastwood (Gadgetman) - Club Secretary

I've not got many '11 photos, and none have that detail on, sorry.

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stephenh

Thanks Dave, just what I needed.

Now then, how to secure the front clamshell, without it blowing away in the wind? Or as Donovan used to say: "the answer my friend is blowing in the wind, the answer is blowing in the wind.":):)

Or thinking about it, maybe it was Peter Paul and Mary?

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Simon Marks - North Oxfordshire AO

I followed the advice in the Build Guide that said use cable ties to retain the clamshells.  I made it easier for the front one by adding little angle brackets to the upper bolts (as per the attached photograph).  With two ties to each side, around the "hinge bar", all seems in order.

Front Clam Hinge.jpgHi, Stephen,

Simon

 

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stephenh

I don't see how your cable ties would prevent the clamshell from falling forward when it is open, although it would certainly avoid any risk of the clamshell coming adrift when it is in the closed position. Oddly, the little "wings" welded onto the main chassis rails, just behind the ends of the tube that the clamshell mounting brackets hook onto look to be solid in your photo, Simon. They have small holes in them on my chassis. I wonder whether I should somehow be tying my brackets to those wings of steel with cable ties or wire somehow?

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Simon Marks - North Oxfordshire AO

Hi, Stephen,

I wasn't expecting any sort of limit on the bonnet opening angle as part of this simple hinge - my reading has always been that the cable ties are to stop the clamshell "hopping off" over bumps or when opening or lowering it. To limit forward rotation of the clamshell so close to the hinge would, I would have thought, promote cracking of the fibreglass around the steel support components.  Back to my bit of 3"x3" fence post to stop the clamshell rolling forward onto the ground!

I did not realise that the little "wings" should have had holes in them and have just carried on without worrying - I thought that their purpose was to stop the clamshell being nudged back in the event of any gentle contact.  I have had a quick look for internet images and the only one that clearly shows the hinge is the car at Paul Matty's and that does not appear to have any cable ties present.

Have you asked Mark Walker how to proceed? 

Simon

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stephenh

Mark isn't in the factory today, Simon. The problem ,largely disappears  if and when I can get a stay made up, like the one on the car which you photographed at Paul Mattys. I'm still hopeful that I can get a nice stainless steel one made by Smiffy's Bits, but I keep forgetting to ring him during normal working hours.

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John

If you bolted a small angle bracket to the lower end of the 'blade' attaching the clam it would contact the underside of the tab on the chassis to stop the bonnet opening forward too far

 

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stephenh

You are right, Johnm, but unfortunately it would mean that you wouldn't be able to remove the bonnet if you should ever need to. The way the brackets work is that to remove the front clamshell, you rotate the clamshell forward until it is standing more or less vertical, with one person each side, and then you can lift it off the round section front rail, which the brackets hinge around. Purely as a temporary measure at this stage, I have tied a tie wrap cable right round each bracket and the round section tube, so as to tie the bracket to the tube whilst still allowing the bracket to rotate around the tube as it is supposed to do, if you see what I mean. I'll try and take a photo to illustrate this tomorrow.

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John
10 hours ago, stephenh said:

You are right, Johnm, but unfortunately it would mean that you wouldn't be able to remove the bonnet if you should ever need to. The way the brackets work is that to remove the front clamshell, you rotate the clamshell forward until it is standing more or less vertical, with one person each side, and then you can lift it off the round section front rail, which the brackets hinge around. Purely as a temporary measure at this stage, I have tied a tie wrap cable right round each bracket and the round section tube, so as to tie the bracket to the tube whilst still allowing the bracket to rotate around the tube as it is supposed to do, if you see what I mean. I'll try and take a photo to illustrate this tomorrow.

Simply unbolt said angle bracket!

 

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stephenh

Oh yes, so who's a clever boy then?:d

Thanks, as ever, John.

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stephenh

Yet another question!

I'm looking at my interior carpet set. The first thing to note is that there is no hole for the gear lever. Is that normal? If so, how do others cut the hole for the gear lever, and how, if at all, do you fix the gear lever gaiter to the carpet?

Also, no hole for the handbrake lever, so the same applies to that, except that presumably a slot rather than a round hole is needed for that? Do people trim the cut edge of the slot for the handbrake, and if so how/what with? Also, how to trim/edge the hole for the gear lever?

Needless to say, the build manual is silent on these points.

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Simon Marks - North Oxfordshire AO

Hi, Stephen,

There were no holes in my carpet set for either the gear lever or the handbrake.  Carpet is easy enough to cut with a Stanley knife (this is how the professionals cut them).  I worked from behind, marking the centres with a Sharpie pen and working out progressively.

For the gear lever, I chose not to use the supplied gaiter (which looked more like a handbrake gaiter in my eyes).  I used an eBay sourced CV boot which I fixed to the aluminium tunnel top using  a (Car Builder Solutions supplied) trim ring, rivnuts and M5 button bolts.  When fitting the carpets, I cut a small round hole in exactly the right position and I feel it snuggles over the CV boot rather nicely.  I have a quickshift gearlever fitted so there are no problems accommodating the required movement.  It may be worth checking how much travel would have to be accommodated with a standard lever.

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The alternative for the gear lever gaiter is to take it to a trimmer and have them cut the supplied vinyl one to size and shape and then sew it into place.  My experience in looking for a trimmer is that they are very busy people and will quote lengthy lead times, even for the smallest of jobs.  My son is friends with a local trimmer's daughter, yet I still had to wait six weeks for four hours of (excellent) work to be fitted in!

Moving on to the handbrake, I am offended by the suggestion in the Eleven Build Manual where a hole is cut through the carpet for the lever and mechanism to be passed through and square of carpet is "popper" fixed to cover this.  I, therefore, took the chance to (over-)engineer my own solution.  I made and vinyl trimmed a perimeter ring, made a (double thickness, contact adhesive glued together) carpet "box" over the handbrake mechanism, with the opening sealed at the lever with an adapted (Land Rover 110) rubber gaiter (I must paint those rivets satin black).

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Since finishing my car, I have seen the below solution to the handbrake on Si Richard's build: http://www.dogs-agility.com/westy_11_build_.htm

Westy_XI_Complete_Interior_F.jpg.f2232b479c5b2817825a31b0308c5e9c.jpg

Westy_XI_Complete_Interior_Top.jpg.6e2326d57ae61b852daa1aab3b70a254.jpg

He appears to have cut a slit in the side carpet and trimmed the opening with red vinyl.  Whilst this has left a little "rucking" in both the side and the top of the carpet, it looks to have been a lot less time consuming to accomplish than my efforts.  Looks like you will need a thick needle and a couple of strong thimbles if you go down this road, unless Mrs H has a rather substantial sewing machine!

Si seems to have used a larger radius trim ring than I did, on top of the carpets, to trim around the gearlever gaiter so there's another option that I discounted.

Simon

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