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Widget1984

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Widget1984

Hi All,

 

I'm after some help with a couple of issues I currently have. The car I've got has been through an engine rebuild, from 101bhp to 146bhp so really pleased with that. Although the car seems to using a huge amount of fuel. Engine is a 2 litre Pinto, bike carbs, Kent cam and 4 into one Westfield manifold with Wunoff silencer. What sort of fuel consumption should I expect? I'm just trying to understadn what sort of range i should get from one tank. The car is a 1990 narrow. It has been set up locally, however is it worth taking to Bogg Brothers for a second opinion, as there is carbon deposit on the exhaust and it still smells a bit "fuelly". 

 

The previous owner in his infinite wisdom decided to slap some 17 inch wheels on, not surprisingly they are rubbing on the wing brackets and stopping full lock being achieved. So i want to put some more appropriate wheels on. Is it best to go for 15s for road use and is there an optimal width? Can some one tell me how to work out the appropriate offset. Its an old narrow with what i assume are Cortina hubs some presume its 4 x 108.

 

I recently rebuilt the braking system. Reconditioned master cylinder, new braided hoses and I rebuilt the calipers. I flushed the brakes and got them working ok. However there was a small leak on the rear hoses. So i replaced the some washers with rubber ones to allow the lines to be cinched up more. Refilled the system and now i cannot get clear brake fluid out of the rears. Comes out quite dark. Any ideas? The rubber washers aren't in contact with the fluid. The brakes also feel more spongy than before.

 

Finally it looks like the gearbox is leaking but it's difficult to see where from. I know the common area is the rear seal. If i replace that it good practice to replace anything else like the speedo seal or front seal. If so, will it be easier to take the box out rather than do it all in situ.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Will

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Geoffrey Carter (Buttercup)

Hi.

 

Just replying to give you a thumbs up to Bogg Brothers.

 

Steve set up my bike carbs for me and his dad did my webers before that.

 

In my opinion they both know there stuff and have a really good reputation around me.

 

Where about are you?

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Terryathome

Have I read that right. You have replaced some of the brake line washers with rubber ones? If so take them off and use proper copper washers, believe me it will be a lot safer.

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scrooge

Agree,rubber washers,umm not a good idea,pinto isn't great on fuel mid 20s if your lucky,sounds like a tune up is in order

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bigals

Re the brakes if your getting dark/dirty fluid out of the back then you still need to flush more fluid through, if the pedal is spongy then you still have air in the system, try jacking the rear of the car up ad far as you can so any air bubbles are encouraged up the lines, as far as rubber washers go, I would be very sceptical about introducing any components that were not specified for a braking system

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bigals

If you know your current size of wheels you can use this website to help you work out wheel and tyre options http://www.willtheyfit.com I went for 15 inch as you can get some really good rubber at a bargain price, some say that 13 inch wheels/tyres are better as you have more give in the sidewall and get more feed back before the tyre loses traction under hard driving, but this did not worry me for road driving

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Bogyoch

What rear brakes do you have?  If you have Sierra calipers, these are an absolute nightmare to bleed.  Air is easily trapped within the caliper.  The best way is to wind the piston all the way back in and then make sure that the bleed nipple is in the upright position.  The dreaded Eazibleed can help here as you can control the fluid coming through, and with a plastic mallet, gentle tapping on the caliper can encourage the air to be bled through.  As far as dirty fluid is concerned, just keep bleeding.  Being an old car, the fluid will be full of dirt and crud.  You may find a litre per wheel will be required.

 

One last point, as everyone has said, please remove those rubber washers.

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Ray The Brake

Please, Please remove those rubber washers, fit copper ones.

Please make sure other seals in the braking system are good

Master Cylinder

Calipers

Rear wheel cylinders

I am a little concerned you have dirty fluid, keep bleeding the system after checking seals.

You commented you flushed the brake system, what did you use as a flushing agent ???

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Welly Jen

Hi All,

 

I'm after some help with a couple of issues I currently have. The car I've got has been through an engine rebuild, from 101bhp to 146bhp so really pleased with that. Although the car seems to using a huge amount of fuel. Engine is a 2 litre Pinto, bike carbs, Kent cam and 4 into one Westfield manifold with Wunoff silencer. What sort of fuel consumption should I expect? I'm just trying to understadn what sort of range i should get from one tank. The car is a 1990 narrow. It has been set up locally, however is it worth taking to Bogg Brothers for a second opinion, as there is carbon deposit on the exhaust and it still smells a bit "fuelly". 

 

>>Hello Will,

 

My 2l Pinto engine has had some sort of go-faster stuff done to it by the builder. Don't know what, but there is a fast road cam in there somewhere and it now gets 152bhp at 6000rpm. When it was on twin 40DCOE weber carbs it used to do less than 20mpg typically. It is now on individual throttle body fuel injection and I typically get between 25 and 30mpg, depending on my right foot. Fuel efficiency will depend on the carbs supplying the correct amount of fuel for each driving condition. Weber DCOE's are not so good at this and tend to be set up for full throttle, high revs. Bike carbs have a reputation for being much better for fuel economy and overall driveability than webers, almost as good as fuel injection. They are of much more modern design. The mpg is never going to be brilliant. Fast road cams on a Pinto can have a lot of overlap, where both inlet and outlet valves are open for part of the cycle. Just a compromise to get a lot of power out of an older design of engine. This can lead to unburnt fuel going straight to the exhaust. Worthwhile taking your car to someone who knows bike carbs and Bogg Bros have a good reputation on here and specialise in them.

 

The previous owner in his infinite wisdom decided to slap some 17 inch wheels on, not surprisingly they are rubbing on the wing brackets and stopping full lock being achieved. So i want to put some more appropriate wheels on. Is it best to go for 15s for road use and is there an optimal width? Can some one tell me how to work out the appropriate offset. Its an old narrow with what i assume are Cortina hubs some presume its 4 x 108.

 

>> Yes, 17" is too big. 15, 14, or 13" is better. 4x108mm yes. Probably 6" wheel width if it is an old narrow. You may have trouble getting 7" in and not hitting something. Is your car a live axle, or independent rear suspension? SE, or SEi? Not sure about offset. There is stuff on here and the internet on how to measure. Best bet I reckon is take your existing wheels, measure those and use that as a basis of selecting the new offset. Compensate for width differences and add/subtract offset to fill the arches without risking contact. 6" wheels will take 185 to 205 width tyres no problem and are a good size with the sort of power you have. The combination of wheel diameter, tyre width and profile may well change the overall tyre diameter. This will change the gearing and feel of the car as well as the speedo calibration. Something else to think about. Lots of topics on here about this, but ask any questions you have too. 185x60, or 205x60 profile on 13 and 14" wheels, maybe 50, or 55 profile on 15" is common.

 

The stopping full lock being achieved? From your avatar it looks like your car has swept wings. I know cycle wings have to have lock stops within the steering rack to prevent the wings hitting the side, but don't think it is an issue with swept wings. What width wheels, offset and what size tyres and profile do you currently have? This may sort itself out with some more sensible sized wheels and tyres. If not, look at lock stops.

 

I recently rebuilt the braking system. Reconditioned master cylinder, new braided hoses and I rebuilt the calipers. I flushed the brakes and got them working ok. However there was a small leak on the rear hoses. So i replaced the some washers with rubber ones to allow the lines to be cinched up more. Refilled the system and now i cannot get clear brake fluid out of the rears. Comes out quite dark. Any ideas? The rubber washers aren't in contact with the fluid. The brakes also feel more spongy than before.

 

>> What everyone else has said. Copper washers, not rubber. Something not right if you are not getting clear fluid out.

 

Finally it looks like the gearbox is leaking but it's difficult to see where from. I know the common area is the rear seal. If i replace that it good practice to replace anything else like the speedo seal or front seal. If so, will it be easier to take the box out rather than do it all in situ.

 

>>There isn't a lot of space around the gearbox in a narrow, so probably less money in the swear box if it comes out. On a narrow of that vintage you'll need to take the engine out too as you can't drop the box out on its own. Either remove the engine and box together, or engine first, then gearbox. Are you sure it is gearbox oil, not engine oil? Leaking oil can travel a long way on a moving car before it drips. Pinto engines have a reputation for incontinence, though not quite as much as crossflows. Protects the chassis from rust though! Gearbox oil smells different from engine oil I find. If the gearbox is out the car, then it is probably a good idea to change other seals if they are easy and cheap to change. I'd also look at how much clutch material is there and replace if thin and probably replace the release bearing too regardless.

 

Jen

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Will

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