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Weber 40 DCOE, any ideas on this little situation?


Lyonspride
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My crossflow powered Westy has been off the road for quite a number of years (8 years) after it became afflicted with a bogging down on acceleration problem (only when warm) and so many "recommended" people took so much money off me without actually fixing the problem (not to mention causing hidden damage to the car), that I was forced to take the car off the road.

 

This year, finally in a well (enough) paid job and not hopping between redundancies, I finally have the cash to start getting this thing back in working order, i've decided to stay away from rip off merchants and basically replace everything until the problem goes away.

 

I've done a lot of work, but I'm stuck on a few very silly things, replacing the misab plates (which are fitted wrong and looking rather tired), cleaning/servicing the carbs and replacing the inlet manifold gasket.

 

My problem is the throttle cable linkage, which requires two flat bladed screwdrivers which cannot be fit into the space available, attempts to remove the throttle cable have resulted in the damage seen (hopefully) in the pictures below.

 

I can't remove the misab plates without getting the carbs out of the car and I can't do that without releasing the throttle cable. If I attempt to carry out this job without removing the carbs from the car, i'm probably going to end up damaging the brake lines or the dizzy.

 

Basically I didn't build the car and this is some silly DIY throttle cable linkage and everything is in the way of everything else...... It's like a jigsaw puzzle.

 

Alternatively, if I have to cut through that clamp (I can't find anything like a replacement), i'm thinking of using a bolt and a lock nut to replace it, then a wire rope thimble and some wire rope clamps to create a loop at the end of the throttle cable.

 

Does anyone know of another way I can do this? Does my "solution" sound reasonable?

 

Assistance greatly appreciated!

 

 

IMG_20140317_182640b.jpg

 

 

IMG_20140317_182632b.jpg

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There are some screwdrivers which have a 90 degree angle that might work. You get them in IKEA furniture, although I am sure you can find some elsewhere. That might overcome the access issue.

 

I have a crossflow on Weber 40s and I replaced the "Heath Robinson" throttle cable linkage (that was fitted to my car when I bought it) with a Weber throttle cable linkage from Burton Power. Its a great bit of kit and I got the one that fits underneath the carbs which tidies the area up nicely. There are cheaper linkages on the market that may do the job, but I am very happy with my choice. One of the benefits (which it looks like you don't have with yours) is a return spring to close the throttle if you cable snaps. That's a vital safety device (I know as I had the misfortune of a wide open throttle sticking on me).

 

Hope that helps.

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2 things spring to mind, 1st can you disconnect the throttle cable at the pedal end and remove the carbs with inner cable still attached and maybe get at the linkage better off the car.

 

2nd a bit labourious but can you file a couple of flats on the screw heads so you can get a spanner on them.

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I have the same set up as you,  Take the screws and nipple out, I gripped the screws with long nosed pliers and slowly loosened them so the cable slides out.   Take the nipple to a fastener shop and ask for some hex headed screws, they should be able to match them.  You can now use small spanners to tighten/undo them.   A return spring is vital in the linkage, if you were racing, the scrutineers will insist on 2 springs.

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^^

 

Return springs I actually have 3, 1 at each end and 1 in the middle, they've been removed in the images though, the 2 end ones are actually attached to brackets on the bolts for the inlet manifold  :)

 

Throttle cable at the pedal end (I only wish it were that simple!!!!), I looked, it can't be removed as it doesn't unhook, it's clearly been threaded through and then carefully had the cable sheath placed back over it before connecting the end to the carbs.

 

The weber throttle linkage, i've looked at a few of them, it's a possibility for the future, but for now i'm ploughing money into solutions to the original problem.

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The 90deg screw drivers BillyPee surgested may do the trick. I think you can get them quite cheaply from Halfords and Machine mart and the like

 If you cut it off would there be enough room to just fit a 10mm bolt with a small hole drilled through it for the cable the locked with a couple of nuts.

 

I'm all for DIY but if you can afford it a proper linkage would be a much better option (sorry for stating the obvious :blush: ).

 

One thing I did notice and is the carbs look like they are mounted too tight to the manifold. There should be a couple of mm gap between the cup washers either side of the rubber moutings behind the lock nuts.

Wow thats hard to discribe. Hope it makes sence. :)

 

Ian

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Just realised the car has been off the road for 8 years, most of us have completely rebuilt our cars 1 or 2 times in that time.   You should be changing the spark plugs, dist. cap, rotor, capacitor as well.

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Just realised the car has been off the road for 8 years, most of us have completely rebuilt our cars 1 or 2 times in that time.   You should be changing the spark plugs, dist. cap, rotor, capacitor as well.

 

Dist cap and rotor were replaced within 50 miles of it being SORN'd, they've been checked recently and are in good condition. The plugs were fouled up, so they've been swapped out.

 

It's an Aldon A series dizzy, based on a Lucas soemthingorother, i'd been considering a trip to Aldon when it's back on the road, to get it looked at and maybe get the dizzy converted to electronic.

 

I'm basically just changing everything that could possibly cause the orginal problem, luckily now (as opposed to 8 years ago) there's a lot more info on the internet and i'm not so much at the mercy of dodgy backstreet rolling road tuners. I do at least have some decent ideas of where to focus my efforts this time.

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Just thought of a 3rd option, cut the cable and fit a new one. Last time I did this I got a bicycle brake cable from Halfords and cut it to length.

 

Only a couple of quid if I remember correctly.

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couldn't you unbolt the throttle linkage from the side of the carb, where it bolts on and just leave the linkage connected to the cable

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Mini mole wrench x 2 or pipe pliers.

Some linkage will allow the cable and nipple out if swiveled around.

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OK, update time.......

 

Good news = I got the mangled screw removed.

 

Bad news = the clamp is a threaded colar with a hole through it adn two screws clamping the cable, the other screw in the other side will not now come out as I have nothing to grip.

 

 

SO, in the end I've cut the throttle cable off the carbs and i'm going to buy either a Weber or Sytec linkage system.

 

Anyhow, started taking stuff apart and it's a bit of a mess......

 

IMG_20140318_204300b.jpg

 

IMG_20140318_204305b.jpg

 

And I think I found the problem ;)

 

IMG_20140318_204527b.jpg

 

 

Joking aside, I now have the lovely task of stripping down the carbs, something i've never even attempted before......

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I took my inlet manifold to a local bead blaster. He cleaned it up to look brand new while I waited. £15 and 15 minutes later I had it back. A lot better than I could have achieved with elbow grease alone.

 

Before you go to the trouble of cleaning it up though, you might want to check that the manifold is true. Your problems might be partly or wholly due to the manifold.

  • If you put a straight edge against the studs does it sit flat across all four, i.e. are the studs aligned. If not, you will have trouble getting the carbs to align which will affect your ability to balance the carbs. Mine were out only slightly so I stuck with the existing manifold (plus I'm tight) but sometimes they can be really out.
  • If you remove the studs and put the manifold on a flat surface, i.e. sheet of glass, does it fit true or does it rock (check both sides). Again, you need to be able to get a consistent seal to the MISAB plates and the carbs which will be difficult to achieve if they are at different heights. If its way off then this might introduce an air leak which could be the reason for your problematic running woes in the first place.

 

BTW, both those points are from the book I linked you to in the other thread. Chances are the manifold is fine but its best to check rather than just focus on the carbs.

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